No Bookmarks Exist.
For the. 00:00:00
Dictation Subcommittee to Order. 00:00:02
Uh. 00:00:06
Is there a motion to approve the agenda for today? 00:00:09
I move to approve the agenda. 00:00:15
Great. 00:00:19
Do we need a? 00:00:21
Roll call vote. 00:00:23
For that. 00:00:24
For approval of the agenda, we're going to do a roll call, vote yes, sure. 00:00:25
Subcommittee member Literary. 00:00:30
Sub sub committee member Myers. 00:00:33
Aye Subcommittee member tips. 00:00:36
Subcommittee member McKenna. 00:00:39
Yes, subcommittee member McConnell. 00:00:41
Subcommittee member Cody. 00:00:44
Great. 00:00:47
Umm. 00:00:48
Are there any subcommittee or? 00:00:49
We'll start off with staff announcements first. 00:00:52
No self announcements. 00:00:56
Are there any subcommittee announcements? 00:00:58
Nothing. 00:01:03
Yeah, I just wanted to make folks aware that the Urban Ocean Lab, which is an incredible think tank. 00:01:03
Has put together ocean climate funding for coastal cities. 00:01:10
A whole list together that's based on. 00:01:15
Of it. 00:01:17
Funding available through the Inflation Reduction Act and outlines. 00:01:19
Deadlines, what grants to apply for, what they apply to, and who those contacts are. So I forwarded on to George SO. 00:01:23
Hopefully that will be on a future agenda for us to discuss, but you can go to the ocean. 00:01:29
Urban Ocean Lab website and see their guidebook. It's pretty incredible to see all of the. I think there's. 00:01:35
About 30 opportunities listed there. 00:01:40
Some of them don't apply, but many of them would. 00:01:44
No other comments from the submit. 00:01:51
Ohh, well, I I don't want to be too pedantic, but it's not officially a subcommittee. It's just a it's just a committee. 00:01:55
Understood. OK. 00:02:01
I know it says subcommittee, it does. But it's it's wrong alright committee. 00:02:04
Great. Thank you. 00:02:11
Any. 00:02:13
Comments from the public that are not relevant to the agenda. 00:02:14
OK. 00:02:27
So moving on. 00:02:29
Our approval of the Minutes. 00:02:32
From May. 00:02:35
Is there a motion to approve the minutes so moved? 00:02:37
All in favor. 00:02:42
Aye. Any opposed? 00:02:43
So approved. 00:02:46
Excellent. So then we are going to move on to item number six of the agenda. We have a presentation from Alex Yasbeck from the 00:02:49
City of Watsonville, who is the environmental projects manager. 00:02:55
Alex is joining us virtually and has done a tremendous job with Watsonville. 00:03:02
Umm. 00:03:08
Climate Action Plan. So we have invited him for this very informative presentation, which why we'll pass it off to Alex now. 00:03:10
Thank you. Thank you for having me. Really appreciate the opportunity. 00:03:20
Um. 00:03:25
Just wanted to check, can anyone see the the slides that I have? I'm not sure what is being presented right now. 00:03:26
Ohh, there we go. OK, I can see it. Great. So so my contact information is there and I would like to just encourage anyone who has 00:03:35
questions about anything I present tonight. 00:03:40
To reach out and contact me, I'm I'm always happy to discuss climate action planning. 00:03:46
In any. 00:03:51
Any questions that come up around it? 00:03:53
And uh. 00:03:56
So. 00:03:57
We can go to the next slide. 00:03:59
Um. 00:04:00
My. 00:04:01
Call in and speaking to you is to. 00:04:03
Give you some ideas of what can. 00:04:06
Be done when when it comes to creating a climate action plan, and I know this is a very dense slide and I apologize for only 00:04:09
having one, but hopefully by the time I go through it, it will make a little bit more sense. 00:04:14
I do want to just preface all of this by saying. 00:04:20
What I'm going to talk about is based on my experience developing a climate action plan for the city of Watsonville. 00:04:23
And my reflections after having adopted the plan. 00:04:29
Uh. 00:04:32
Some some thoughts that have come to me after. 00:04:33
You know, in the follow up to having had that plan put in place, I would definitely encourage this committee to look at other 00:04:36
cities climate action plans. 00:04:41
And to speak to other. 00:04:46
City. 00:04:48
You know people in my role at other cities so that that you can get some different opinions. I I do recognize that my. 00:04:49
Ideas around climate action planning are probably not. 00:04:56
As conventional as as most cities. 00:04:59
So with that said. 00:05:02
On the left there I have the conventional approach to climate action planning. This is also the correct approach, and by that I 00:05:04
mean. 00:05:09
Nothing in this approach is out of the ordinary. 00:05:15
Or. 00:05:19
Um. 00:05:20
Controversial in any way. 00:05:21
So a conventional climate action plan. 00:05:23
In California almost always follows the same. 00:05:26
Recipe. 00:05:30
A city does a greenhouse gas inventory. 00:05:31
And I think in the Ambag region we all get our greenhouse gas inventories from handbag that that is something that they. 00:05:34
Do they? 00:05:43
Received funding through whatever sources to prepare that for every. 00:05:44
Jurisdiction in their region once you have that inventory. 00:05:48
The city sets a target. For example, we want to be. 00:05:52
80% below our 1990 greenhouse gas levels by. 00:05:57
2030 or 2040, whatever that target is. 00:06:02
He then goes through the Capcoa methodologies. The Capcoa is the. 00:06:06
California Air Pollution Control Officers Association. 00:06:12
And they have come up with a methodology that assigns. 00:06:16
Greenhouse gas reductions to any measure as city adopts. So for example if you were to say. 00:06:20
We are going to install. 00:06:26
20 electric vehicle charging stations. 00:06:28
There's a Capcom method that says 20 stations, each one accounts for X amount, and there's a. 00:06:31
Big. 00:06:37
Modeling program and or. 00:06:38
Spreadsheet that goes along with this and and then it comes out and says yes if you do that. 00:06:40
You will. 00:06:44
Achieve a 3% reduction in your greenhouse gases by 2030 and so the CAPCO methodology is key to all of this and that you. 00:06:46
You quantify all of the things that you say you're going to do so that you can show that you can meet that target that you've 00:06:54
picked. 00:06:58
Once you have. 00:07:03
A pathway to compliance. You then get your plan. 00:07:04
Sequel qualified. I hope everyone in this room knows what sequel is. California Environmental Quality Act. 00:07:07
But a sequel? Qualified plan? Any plan a city adopts? 00:07:14
Is is meant to be sequel qualified? 00:07:19
And what that means is that you you have a realistic method to achieve and implement the plan. 00:07:22
It also means that if you as a jurisdiction fail to implement that plan, you can be taken to court. It is a legally binding action 00:07:28
that you're taking. 00:07:32
And so that's, that's the conventional approach. It typically takes 18 to 24 months. 00:07:38
And typically costs between 150 and $250,000. 00:07:43
And I'm including all of the. 00:07:48
All of the consultant fees that typically go into creating a conventional plan. 00:07:52
Uh. 00:07:56
And just to sort of further explain the conventional plan, typically everything in there is, there's strategies and measures and 00:07:57
those are all those things that have that associated greenhouse gas reduction. 00:08:02
That goes along with with. 00:08:09
Adopting the strategies and implementing those measures. 00:08:10
There's a lot of tracking of progress. Typically this kind of plan will have a website or a web app or some sort of dashboard. 00:08:14
To show how the jurisdiction is where the jurisdiction is in achieving that. 00:08:21
That those goals and how far along you are if you're on track, behind track, that kind of thing. 00:08:27
The big advantage of a conventional plan is it's enforceable. 00:08:32
So you know. 00:08:36
If there's something in there. 00:08:38
Um. 00:08:39
Staff would come to City Council and say. 00:08:41
We have committed to creating an EV. 00:08:44
Transition plan for our city fleet. 00:08:47
We need to do this. It's something that we have adopted. 00:08:49
And if you fail to do that, some environmental group could come to the city and say, look, this is in your plan. 00:08:52
It's SQL qualified. You need to be working on this to get it done. 00:08:57
The other thing with the conventional approach is the focus is always on greenhouse gases. 00:09:02
And this is something that I feel like is a new. 00:09:08
Area and climate action planning. 00:09:11
Historically, climate action has always been focused on. 00:09:14
Greenhouse gases, and not necessarily on. 00:09:18
Adaptation. 00:09:22
On sea level rise on. 00:09:24
Land use on. 00:09:28
You know, loss of habitat, biodiversity, those things were not part of climate action planning. It was always just on how can we 00:09:31
reduce our greenhouse gas emissions? 00:09:35
Because we know that there's negative impacts from the greenhouse gas emissions. 00:09:40
But it was typically not. 00:09:44
Very focused on on how to respond to those negative impacts. 00:09:47
Umm. 00:09:51
So. 00:09:52
The conventional approach, it is a great tool to create some change in the city, typically what comes out of that? 00:09:53
Conventional plan is a fleet electrification plan. 00:09:59
You know some I. 00:10:04
Deer run, organic composting or sorry, the composting of organics, EV charging, electrification, those kinds of things typically 00:10:05
come out of there. 00:10:10
And uh. 00:10:15
The reason I am no longer a fan of the conventional approach is that every city across the state who does a conventional 00:10:16
greenhouse, a conventional climate action plan. 00:10:21
Typically comes up with the exact same things. 00:10:27
And by that I mean we know. 00:10:29
Through our greenhouse gas inventories that. 00:10:32
Across the state, transportation is the biggest source of emissions. That is then followed by natural gas use in buildings. 00:10:34
And then followed by organics decomposing in landfills and then electricity used to be a big. 00:10:43
Source of greenhouse gas emissions, but because we're inside the three CE territory Central Coast Community Energy. 00:10:51
Our electricity is now extremely clean. It's mostly renewable. 00:10:58
It's almost 100% carbon. 00:11:02
Neutral. So electricity is no longer a source of greenhouse gases for our community. 00:11:05
Um. 00:11:10
And again, another reason I'm not a huge fan of conventional approach is because the state is passing laws that. 00:11:11
In a sense, force cities and jurisdictions to do the things that are typically identified in a greenhouse gas. Sorry, in a climate 00:11:18
action plan. 00:11:22
And some quick examples of those. 00:11:26
SB1383. 00:11:29
Requires that all cities compost their organics. 00:11:31
So if you're as a resident, I'm sure you've already. 00:11:35
I'm not exactly sure what's going on, but I imagine that something is happening where you are now. Composting your kitchen waste. 00:11:38
Composting your yard waste. 00:11:42
That's a state requirement. There's no way. 00:11:46
Around that. And whether you had a climate action plan or you didn't, you have to do that. 00:11:49
A similar thing is happening with fleet electrification. 00:11:53
There are new state laws saying that you have to electrify your fleet and you have to do it in this process and you have to show 00:11:57
that if you as a city are purchasing a new pickup truck. 00:12:02
You have to first try and buy an electric pickup truck. 00:12:08
If it's not available, you can then buy a gas one but. 00:12:11
The rules are there, they start to be in place on what has to be done. 00:12:14
EV charging is happening organically as as. 00:12:19
Companies just deploy EV charging in the community. It's there. 00:12:23
And a similar thing is happening with electrification. 00:12:27
At some point you as a resident will not be able to go buy. 00:12:30
A natural gas hot water heater because there will only be a heat pump hot water heater available in the store. A similar thing 00:12:35
happening with a. 00:12:39
Stoves cook tops. 00:12:44
At some point you will no longer be able to buy a natural gas. 00:12:45
Cooking. 00:12:49
Product you will only be able to buy an electric. 00:12:50
Version. 00:12:53
And. 00:12:54
I say that as a positive thing because it it really leads to the question of. 00:12:55
What is left for a city to do when it comes to climate action? 00:13:00
And so that's why switching to the right hand side of this slide. 00:13:04
I want to start thinking about the non conventional, innovative ways that cities can approach climate action planning. 00:13:08
And and my hope in this is that. 00:13:14
Something more innovative comes out of this process. 00:13:17
And that as a city, you actually end up doing more. 00:13:20
To address climate change than you would. 00:13:23
Had you taken the conventional approach? 00:13:26
Um. 00:13:28
So I would say, is there really a need for the city to do their your own greenhouse gas inventory? 00:13:29
Why we We know exactly what's in there. 00:13:36
We know what the answers are going to be before we even do it. We know transportation is the biggest source. We know all these 00:13:39
things. 00:13:41
So why spend all the money to have a consultant go through there to? 00:13:44
To. 00:13:49
Break it down to the, you know, decimal place. 00:13:49
You know Ohh transportation is 48.35%. It's not gonna change anything that the city does, knowing the accuracy that typically 00:13:52
comes out of this process. 00:13:57
And. 00:14:03
Again, the cap Co, a methodology, it's exciting, it's interesting, it's great. 00:14:04
But does it really get you towards knowing? 00:14:08
Ohh, it doesn't really get you to do actions you would not otherwise be taking. 00:14:13
And again, the sequel qualification. 00:14:17
It's an exciting thing, but I don't know if it really leads. 00:14:20
To those actions that that. 00:14:24
The city should be taking and that would actually lead to to real change in your community or community. 00:14:26
Um. 00:14:31
And again, if you took a non conventional approach, this could take anywhere from 2 to 12 months instead. 00:14:32
And the cost could be anywhere from 10 to 100,000 and again that's just a a guess on my part. 00:14:37
Um. 00:14:43
An example of this community that did not do a conventional approach is the County of Santa Cruz. 00:14:44
They chose to do a an approach that was not. 00:14:50
Sequel qualified. 00:14:54
I think they still use some of the Capcom methodology. 00:14:55
But. 00:14:59
Their approach allowed them to start looking at. 00:14:59
Land use in the county. 00:15:02
Uh, what does it mean? 00:15:04
It was more of a philosophical take on how do we really change the way we exist in this community to address climate change and so 00:15:06
moving away from that greenhouse gas focus. 00:15:12
I think this actually is a more exciting plan that they came up with. 00:15:18
Um, so one idea I had was is it possible to do? 00:15:23
For a city to adopt a list of climate action strategies. A list of climate action goals. 00:15:28
It's not a plan. It doesn't need to be SQL qualified. 00:15:33
But it does list all the things that the city should be looking into and supporting. 00:15:37
So, for example, something on that list could be electrify the city's municipal fleet. 00:15:41
It could be. 00:15:47
You know, advocate at a state level for. 00:15:49
Um, a phase out of gas appliances. It could be anything on that list. 00:15:52
There's a lot of freedom that comes with this. What are the focused areas that make sense for your community and what are the 00:15:57
focus areas that you would not, that don't do not make sense for your community? 00:16:02
Um. 00:16:07
If you. 00:16:08
As the community did not have control over. 00:16:09
Uh. 00:16:13
Your. 00:16:13
Your. 00:16:15
Wastewater treatment plant would be an example. 00:16:17
You can't really. 00:16:19
Make change happen at that wastewater treatment plant. 00:16:22
Because it's not in your control. So so I think. 00:16:24
A lot of this has to do with with with really looking at what can be done in your city. 00:16:28
What levers do you have to pull to make these changes, and and where should you be focusing your energy? 00:16:33
And again, I would say if you're gonna be focusing energy, you could then start bringing in things like environmental stewardship. 00:16:41
Coastline management, sea level preparedness, things that. 00:16:48
Don't really have a. 00:16:51
Greenhouse gas. 00:16:52
Reduction associated with them, but are things that as a community you can and should be doing to. 00:16:54
Be preparing for climate change and to be. 00:17:00
Limiting your your contribution to climate change. So again, you could start moving into things like deep sustainability, whatever 00:17:04
that means for your community. It does give you latitude to focus on adaptation, restoration. 00:17:10
Land use justice, equity, health, emergency response. 00:17:17
Again, it's. It's a much. 00:17:21
And again, I'm I'm going into the philosophy of climate change and climate action, but I think it's important. I think this is the 00:17:24
time if you're developing a plan. 00:17:27
And again it it. 00:17:31
Ask the question, what is the role of the state? What is the role of your community? 00:17:33
And I I've fully acknowledged that this is. 00:17:38
Not the conventional. 00:17:42
Look at climate action planning but. 00:17:44
I think it's worth looking into and I would look at every climate action plan that you can. 00:17:47
And speak to as many climate action. 00:17:52
Practitioners in the state to see what their look on this is or what their assessment of this is. 00:17:54
And again, if, if, if this was 2018 and I was talking to you. 00:18:01
I would be firmly in the conventional. 00:18:05
Side of climate action planning. 00:18:07
Just just, you know, five years ago. 00:18:09
That made a lot of sense because there were not yet those rules from the state. 00:18:11
That required all of these actions that we were already doing. 00:18:15
But now that it's 2023, I think. 00:18:18
That the the concept of a traditional climate action plan is not as valid as it was just five years ago. 00:18:21
So with that, I appreciate my the opportunity to say all of this. 00:18:27
I realize that's probably gonna be a lot of questions, so I'd like to. 00:18:32
Stop here and and open it up. 00:18:36
To to answer any questions that. 00:18:38
May be coming my way. 00:18:41
Any questions from members of the public? 00:18:46
One moment please. 00:19:05
We have a hand raised in the room. 00:19:07
You're welcome to come to the front. 00:19:11
And. 00:19:13
We'll set the timer for 3 minutes. 00:19:15
Hi. 00:19:25
Umm. 00:19:27
My name is Kathy Durbin. I am a relatively new Comer at a Pacific Grove, but I did a lot of work on the city of Berkeley's Climate 00:19:28
Action Plan, which started in 2008. 00:19:33
And went through some of the very stages that Alex talked about. 00:19:38
But I think in the last five years, cities have been moving towards doing what he he's talking about. So Alex, thank you very much 00:19:41
for your presentation. 00:19:45
I'm really excited about Watsonville. 00:19:50
Climate Action Plan and I think. 00:19:53
The piece that it starts with is a very strong commitment. 00:19:56
To doing climate action throughout your community and engaging people. 00:20:00
And partnerships. 00:20:05
And making a strong statement. 00:20:09
That you plan to get as close to carbon neutrality or negative carbon emissions as possible, so you have greenhouse gases. 00:20:12
In there. 00:20:20
Pretty centrally, even though I like kind of the additional kind of perspective you're you're approaching it through. 00:20:22
But I have a question about how your community did. 00:20:30
Reach agreement on that very strong commitment. 00:20:33
And very ambitious. 00:20:37
Umm. 00:20:39
Uh. 00:20:41
Statements in the plan and and how you feel like both the elected officials and the community are. 00:20:42
Respond have responded to that. 00:20:48
And are helping you actually achieve the goals that you've laid out. 00:20:50
Kathy thank you that that's that's a really. 00:20:57
Fantastic question I I I'm so happy you asked this. 00:20:59
So back in in 2018-2019 when we were working on our new Climate action plan update. 00:21:04
I was a firm believer in exactly what we. 00:21:12
What went into our climate action plan? Those those really ambitious commitments to greenhouse gas reductions? 00:21:15
It was something I I fully embraced. 00:21:22
And we were able to do that because we had the support of. 00:21:26
We had. 00:21:29
Three strong advocates on City Council at the time who were. 00:21:31
Absolutely committed to doing as much as possible and we had. 00:21:34
Two to three council members who were. 00:21:38
Moderate supporters and went along. And so we we were in this golden moment of a lot of support on City Council. 00:21:40
And and a lot of direction from City Council and we went with it. 00:21:46
And at the time it it felt fantastic it it really just seemed like we were doing the right thing. 00:21:50
And I don't think we did the wrong thing, but what I'm seeing now. 00:21:55
Almost five years later, is. 00:21:59
We have not had been able to. 00:22:01
To do the things that we need to do to to create that change. 00:22:05
There's the reality to climate action work, and that is. 00:22:10
Not everyone feels the urgency of it. 00:22:14
Not everyone feels that it's their role to be. 00:22:17
Doing this work, not everyone feels like. 00:22:21
The actions we're telling them to take are actually going to be meaningful in their lives or meaningful to climate action, change 00:22:23
to climate. 00:22:27
To stopping climate change. 00:22:31
Um. 00:22:33
So. 00:22:33
I've personally had a. 00:22:35
A change of heart, in a sense, in that. 00:22:36
I still believe that this is important, that it's part of it, that it's that it shows something, that it's useful. 00:22:39
But at the same time. 00:22:45
I don't know how to. 00:22:47
To get residents in Watsonville. 00:22:49
To get behind climate. 00:22:52
Action work, and so much of it is things like. 00:22:53
Residents feel trapped where they are. They don't feel like they have the luxury to do the things that we're telling them to do. 00:22:59
Evie adoption is a great example of that. 00:23:03
We know that it's cheaper to to drive an electric vehicle. It's cheaper to own an electric vehicle. 00:23:09
And that an electric vehicle works for probably 90%, so would work for 90% of our residents or or some large number like that. 00:23:15
But there is so much. 00:23:24
Fear around. 00:23:26
Getting an EV vehicle, there's so much, there's so many barriers around the the cost to to purchase an EV vehicle. There's so many 00:23:27
barriers around how those. 00:23:31
Those incentives are structured that our residents don't have access to. 00:23:37
To the capital to 1st buy a vehicle and then wait six months to get a rebate. 00:23:41
So what I'm starting to see is that. 00:23:45
The climate action that makes sense for us as a city. 00:23:48
Is we could be spending. 00:23:51
A year or two years or three years? 00:23:54
Trying to get people to electrify their homes voluntarily. 00:23:57
Or the alternative is. 00:24:01
At a state level. 00:24:03
We we phase out the sale of gas appliances and gas hot water heaters. 00:24:05
And gas Home heaters. 00:24:10
And then as our residents need to change and upgrade or their their hot water heater goes out. 00:24:12
They go to Home Depot and the only option they have. 00:24:17
Is a highly efficient electric hot water heater, and that's when they make that change. 00:24:20
And so I've I've shifted into trying to create a system where the choices are residents have are the right choices. 00:24:24
Where the choices they have. 00:24:32
Is the choice that is the one that we want them to have. 00:24:35
Because that voluntary, voluntary. 00:24:38
Adoption voluntary change doesn't seem like one that is happening very quickly. 00:24:41
And. 00:24:45
And again, going back to to that, that ambitious climate goal. 00:24:47
It's it's it's amazing. And yet. 00:24:51
Our climate. 00:24:54
Our City Council has changed. 00:24:55
We no longer have the same level of support. 00:24:57
And I I don't know what to do anymore to. 00:25:00
To to really. 00:25:04
Drive the change and the shift that needs to happen in our community. 00:25:06
And so that's that's where. 00:25:10
Trying to figure out are there other ways to to to? 00:25:12
To change the system. 00:25:16
So that what our residents automatically do. 00:25:17
Adds up to those. 00:25:21
To those reductions in emissions. 00:25:23
It's a. 00:25:26
It's an incredibly difficult problem it's it's so complex to try and address and I and I think that's where. 00:25:27
Sometimes I think have we just picked three things and said we just gonna focus on these three things. That's our climate action 00:25:32
goal for the city. 00:25:35
We probably would have got. 00:25:39
Further. 00:25:40
If we'd only focused on three things, then having the, you know, 70 odd. 00:25:41
Measures and strategies in our Climate Action Plan. 00:25:46
And at the same time, it's wonderful to have those 7080 measures because we can always go back to them and say we need to be doing 00:25:50
this work because it is identified in our climate action plan. 00:25:54
Sorry, that was a very long answer, but but Kathy I really appreciate that question. I think it's you really hit to the heart of 00:26:00
this whole issue that we're facing. 00:26:03
Yeah. Thank you. 00:26:07
Thank you, Kathy. 00:26:08
Any hands raised online? 00:26:09
No hands raised. 00:26:16
Opening it up to members of the committee. 00:26:17
Or questions or. 00:26:20
For Alex. 00:26:23
Thank you. 00:26:27
And thank you, Alex for the presentation. 00:26:27
I thought it was like kind of eye opening when when you explained it so so thank you for sharing your thoughts here. 00:26:31
Umm. 00:26:38
I also thought like the presentation, the way you had it colored, it looked like the top half was all carbon, the bottom has was 00:26:40
carbon free. 00:26:43
So it's kind of interesting how you have the colors in there. 00:26:48
Umm. 00:26:51
To me the you you did mention the the traditional approach with Sequa. 00:26:52
And so on. There were some legal implications. 00:26:57
That the non conventional. 00:27:01
May not have so. 00:27:04
Could you explain how? 00:27:06
So with the non conventional approach that you have cited. 00:27:07
Are there legal implications to that? 00:27:11
Uh, so I I need to be careful here in how I answer this question. Uh, it's it's a very good question. 00:27:14
Umm. 00:27:20
I am not a planner, so so sequel is not something that I do. 00:27:21
On a daily basis. 00:27:26
But my understanding and I and I again want you to to verify with with either city legal counsel or or a consultant is. 00:27:28
A sequel qualified plan. 00:27:37
Let's say you were to adopt A plan. 00:27:40
And it was not sequel qualified. 00:27:42
You would then be exposed to. 00:27:45
To legal risk. 00:27:48
Because someone could say to you. 00:27:50
You you you made this claim that you're gonna do all this stuff, but you didn't actually have a pathway to achieve it. 00:27:51
And that would that would be the risk there. So the Sequa qualification actually then is a. 00:27:57
Protection against. 00:28:02
Being sued and being challenged in court. 00:28:04
What I was proposing is so that, so there's all of those issues around a conventional climate action plan. 00:28:07
So what I'm proposing instead or what I would? 00:28:13
Hope would actually work instead. 00:28:16
If the city said, look. 00:28:18
We don't actually have the mechanisms to to. 00:28:20
Reduce carbon in a meaningful way. 00:28:23
In a way that we think is. 00:28:25
Plausible is practical, is affordable whatever it is, whatever case you make for not doing a sequel qualified plan but instead 00:28:26
said we have these goals. 00:28:31
We know we need to electrify our fleet. 00:28:36
But we're going to do it. 00:28:39
We're going to commit to it and we're going to do it as much as we can. 00:28:40
But there's no actual. 00:28:43
Metric in there so that no one come to you and say, hey you didn't. 00:28:46
You then electrify your fleet as fast as possible. 00:28:49
It gives the city room to say, look, we we know that we're trying as hard as we can. Here's the reason we didn't buy an electric 00:28:52
vehicle. It was not available. There was a two year lead time We needed to replace the vehicle right away. But know that as a 00:28:56
city, we've committed to this. 00:29:01
It's just on our own time frame, our own ability to implement, implement, and again, it's it's. 00:29:06
It's it's a concept. So if. 00:29:12
If what I'm saying doesn't. 00:29:14
Workout or doesn't pan out, it's. 00:29:16
I I I apologize ahead of time, but but I just feel like there has to be a better way. 00:29:18
Than how SQL qualified plans because one of the things that that sequel qualification process sort of strips away. 00:29:23
Is It strips away your ability to be innovative and it strips strips away your ability to. 00:29:32
Approach these problems differently. It strips away your ability to be flexible. 00:29:37
And those are the qualities that I think are are essential in climate action. 00:29:41
Work is that. 00:29:46
Yeah. 00:29:47
We're suddenly now in a place where things are changing rapidly. 00:29:48
From the The issues around technology. 00:29:52
You know. 00:29:56
We were all. 00:29:57
Working on electric vehicles right now. 00:29:58
If there's a technology breakthrough. 00:30:01
You want to be ready to take advantage of it, but the secret plan doesn't really. 00:30:03
Allow that flexibility to happen if you. 00:30:07
Worried, but as a city to budget money towards. 00:30:11
Home electrification. But suddenly realized that. 00:30:14
Flood proofing or fire proofing needs to be the next thing you focus on. 00:30:17
You don't want to be tied up with whatever that that thing is and that that's where where I'm where I'm My reason for being 00:30:21
critical of the conventional approach is I don't see it as allowing you the flexibility to respond in the way you should. 00:30:27
Or the way you may need to. I think it's probably a better way to put it. 00:30:33
Understood, because there are some, certainly a lot of thoughts. 00:30:37
And this is a follow up to that. Have you also thought about what this non conventional approach needs to be called as it's still 00:30:43
a climate action plan? 00:30:48
Or or what is it? 00:30:53
And and this again is where I would, I would. 00:30:55
Go back to the. 00:30:59
The rules about. 00:31:01
Adopting plans as a city. 00:31:04
If a city adopts a plan, my understanding is if a city adopts a plan, any plan, that plan needs to be secret qualified. 00:31:06
So I would I would find a way to make sure that whatever you do. 00:31:14
Does not qualify for that because then you have the flexibility to. 00:31:18
To move forward, so it could be a. 00:31:22
A planning strategy, perhaps, or a. 00:31:25
Uh. 00:31:30
A list of goals. 00:31:31
Or list of focus areas. 00:31:33
And it's again, it's, it's a very. 00:31:36
You're walking a very. 00:31:39
Narrow path between. 00:31:41
Telling people what you intend to do, where your focus is going to be, without saying this is a plan. 00:31:44
And and again, it's it's just my. 00:31:49
Personal belief at this point because I'm seeing how the sequel qualified plan is not serving us in the way that it was meant to 00:31:52
serve us. We have this document, It's fantastic. It has a lot of good stuff in there. 00:31:58
But we're not seeing the implementation. 00:32:04
Happening the way that it should be and that's that's the pitfall I'm hoping. 00:32:06
You can avoid. 00:32:11
Where where you you can focus on just the things that make sense for you. 00:32:13
And understood and final question for me. 00:32:18
Is Watson world and kind of pivoting to somewhat of a non conventional approach with with you on board here? 00:32:21
I I would say no. 00:32:29
For us, it's that we are seeing. 00:32:33
All the things we wanted to do. 00:32:37
Are being uh. 00:32:39
Are being mandated through other. 00:32:42
Channels. 00:32:44
So a great example is our fleet electrification. 00:32:45
We did not know that the state would be passing fleet electrification laws or or 0 emission. 00:32:48
Fleet laws. 00:32:54
When we did our climate action plan. 00:32:55
And and so this new law from the state requiring jurisdictions to have electric fleets or to have 0 emission fleets. 00:32:58
Has. Has. 00:33:04
Essentially nullified part of our plan or or I shouldn't say it that way, I should say it complements our plan. 00:33:06
But had we known, we could have left out. 00:33:11
That section we could have saved. 00:33:13
Quite a few hours in preparing this plan. 00:33:16
And because that law has a has a mandate associated with it has reporting associated with it has fines associated with it, that's 00:33:19
what we're that's throwing on you focus is how do we comply with the state law. 00:33:25
So we no longer looking at the climate action plan and saying, ohh, what's our climate action plan? Let's do that. It's well, we 00:33:32
have a real. 00:33:35
Legal. Legally binding. 00:33:38
Issue here. 00:33:40
Our fleet manager could go to jail if we don't comply with this. That's that's where our focus is. 00:33:41
So I would say it's not that we're pivoting, it's that. 00:33:47
We're recognizing how ambitious our plan was. 00:33:50
And how the the? 00:33:54
The the strong actions of things where we're. 00:33:57
Learning we're now need needing to do anyway. 00:33:59
And the soft actions of things that we were unable to really get the political will to. 00:34:02
To implement in a big way. 00:34:06
And and I do recognize that if you spoke to me and you know, if we have this conversation again in five years. 00:34:09
Maybe I will have yet another different insight into what happened. I just really wanted to. 00:34:14
To put it out there that there may be other ways. 00:34:20
To do this work that are. 00:34:22
Potentially that will potentially have a bigger impact in your community. 00:34:25
With less. 00:34:29
Paper being generated with less. 00:34:31
You know. 00:34:34
Consultants being paid to prepare big documents that you know. 00:34:35
Yeah. 00:34:39
Often do not really get used in the way that they were intended initially. 00:34:40
And again, I would encourage you to look at a lot of different municipalities to see how they have done this work, how they've 00:34:44
approached this problem. 00:34:47
Because I think it's very inspiring to see all the different approaches. 00:34:50
Yes. 00:34:53
And so, as far as I know, everything that I've seen. 00:34:54
As a region of 2.0, so this probably requires 1. 00:34:57
But thank you, I appreciate your your comments here and and thank you for being here. Yeah, my my pleasure and I I should say this 00:35:01
is probably version 3.0 at this. 00:35:04
Point. 00:35:09
You know there there the the 1.0 would have been. 00:35:10
Climate Action Plans Prepared, You Know, 2005, 2010. 00:35:12
And then the 2.0 plans are the ones that would prepare, you know, 2015, 2020? 00:35:16
So I I now feel like we're as a state shifting to something that's that's more applicable. 00:35:21
Just wanted to make sure. 00:35:32
That I understand this. So the non conventional plans. 00:35:34
Umm. 00:35:39
Do those meet the requirements? 00:35:40
That would be needed in order to get funding or grants. 00:35:43
Again, that's a very good consideration. 00:35:48
Um. 00:35:51
What we're seeing is. 00:35:53
You know, roughly 10 years ago. 00:35:57
Often a city was ineligible for grants if they did not have a climate action plan. 00:35:59
But what we're seeing now is there's a a new focus on on equity in in. 00:36:07
In getting grant money out to communities. 00:36:12
And there's a recognition that many disadvantaged communities or smaller communities were unable to prepare. Climate Action plans 00:36:15
did not have the resources to do the planning to then get the grants. 00:36:20
And that's that's now seen as as as inequitable. 00:36:26
And so. 00:36:30
Having a climate action plan in place. 00:36:31
Is no longer. 00:36:34
And it's essential to get money to do. 00:36:35
The work that you want to do. 00:36:39
And in fact, many of the grants that we as a city apply for often have. 00:36:40
A technical assistance element to them. 00:36:45
Or even a plan, you know. 00:36:49
You know planning element to those, to those grants. So for example, you know we were looking at a Caltrans grant just yesterday 00:36:51
and one of the things that would have would pay for if we were a coastal city would be a sea level rise study and the impacts of 00:36:57
sea level rise in transportation networks. But there was no requirement that the community first do climate action planning before 00:37:03
being eligible for that grant. 00:37:09
So so. 00:37:16
So I I know that that that. 00:37:17
The idea that you need a climate action plan before you can apply for funding. 00:37:21
Is one that that was true. 00:37:25
10 years ago, it doesn't. It no longer seems to be true. 00:37:28
And again, this is my my understanding, my experience. It would definitely be a question I would bring to a consultant and say. 00:37:31
What are what are the risks we're running by not doing a secret qualified plan, are we? 00:37:38
Making ourselves ineligible for future funding. 00:37:45
Thank you. That was that was very important formative. I have one more question. You mentioned Santa Cruz County as a good example 00:37:51
of a nonconventional plan. Do you have any others off the top of your head that you would recommend us to look at? 00:37:57
I don't. 00:38:05
I. 00:38:08
And again, it's. 00:38:10
I I do need to recognize that I I am. 00:38:11
You know, being I'm here as a representative from the city of Watsonville. 00:38:14
A lot of my perception on this is my personal. 00:38:18
Perception of what's going on. 00:38:23
And I was very impressed. By what? 00:38:24
The county of Santa Cruz did, I think. I think there was something very special about their plan that really seemed to capture. 00:38:26
More of the importance of what needs to be done as a community. 00:38:33
And I felt like their ability to. 00:38:37
To sort of. 00:38:40
Go further than a conventional climate action plan. 00:38:40
Was only because they did not make it a secret qualified plan they were able to put in. 00:38:44
Aspirations in there that are not quantifiable that that. 00:38:50
That if it were a secret, qualified plan, they probably would not be able to make those same aspirational statements. 00:38:54
And and again, I I know I said this during the presentation, but I I feel like I really need to emphasize, emphasize this. 00:38:59
A lot of this work has to do with. 00:39:05
How big your community is? What are the tools you have? What are the changes you can make in the community? 00:39:07
And each community is different. 00:39:13
You know, there's a lot of open space in your community then. 00:39:16
Naturally, the focus tends to be on. 00:39:18
Natural and working lands and Land Management. If your community is very dense, you know there's all these different how much is 00:39:21
gonna be climate adaptation? 00:39:24
Basically reacting to climate change, so we are a coastal. 00:39:29
City. 00:39:35
And climate action is certainly literally on our doorstep. 00:39:37
The the issue of Sequoia. 00:39:41
That requires a project. 00:39:45
So not all plans require Sequoia, because not all plans have projects that require Sequa analysis. 00:39:48
But it does raise the point once you commit to this, and it's a legally binding. 00:39:57
A project perhaps? 00:40:04
There are. 00:40:06
That's certainly something we can get legal advice on. 00:40:08
That's not a problem as far as I see, but. 00:40:10
The subcommittee has to come to terms of whether we would like to see these plans move forward as far as elements in our general 00:40:13
plan. 00:40:17
Or even our local coastal program? 00:40:22
And if they are, if they are components of those two documents, then you are liable. 00:40:25
Once it's in your general plan, there is an expectation and a legal requirement of performance, so we would need to think 00:40:31
carefully about what. 00:40:36
Programs and policies we want to move forward because if they do get integrated into the general plan or LCP. 00:40:41
Umm. 00:40:49
They have to be acknowledged and and and and followed so. 00:40:51
I think that is a good point to to raise the sequel, but I do want to point out it only applies to specific projects, and projects 00:40:55
have a specific definition within the context of Sequa. 00:41:00
I. 00:41:06
I do appreciate transportation is our biggest, our biggest source of greenhouse gas emissions. 00:41:07
We did get a preliminary report from Ambag that said it was about 73%. 00:41:15
But. 00:41:21
None of that. 00:41:21
Analysis. 00:41:23
And we are a tourist community, as you well know. 00:41:26
And tourism is not factored in to that budget. So I think. 00:41:29
Although it is an expenditure. 00:41:34
I think we should think about. 00:41:37
Doing of more detailed analysis of how tourism. 00:41:40
Impacts. 00:41:44
Greenhouse gas emissions and what we can do to mitigate them here locally. 00:41:46
Umm. 00:41:51
17 Almost 18% of Pacific Grove are secondary homes, so people are traveling out of the area. 00:41:52
To come visit their their second homes in Carmel, it's almost 39%. 00:42:00
So none of that's really captured in the Ambag analysis. 00:42:06
So I think we do need to understand how, as a tourist community, we are attracting essentially the. 00:42:10
Emissions. 00:42:17
And how we can help mitigate it? 00:42:18
Umm. 00:42:20
And that's why when when we spoke, council recently spoke about hiring a consultant. 00:42:21
For doing our general plan update. 00:42:28
You know, relative to our housing element. 00:42:31
I thought it was too early to commit to a contract because we don't know what we're we don't know what we want, we don't know what 00:42:35
kind of plan we want, so. 00:42:39
I think the first thing this this sub committee needs to determine is what plan do we want? Do we want just climate action? 00:42:43
Or do we want climate action and adaptation? Or we could just say we want climate adaptation. 00:42:50
And it all comes back to the. 00:42:56
To the point raised earlier by Alex and others is. 00:42:58
Focus on achievable goals. 00:43:01
So. 00:43:03
I think that's that's a good. 00:43:04
That's a good starting point for us and I think we have to really come to terms with that sooner than later. 00:43:08
I will say that we do have approximately, I kind of did a little inventory on my own. We have about 90 electrical meters in the 00:43:12
city that are city, you know city owned cities. 00:43:17
Pays the bill on. 00:43:23
35 of them are PG&E meters or that are linked to PG&E accounts and then 55 are linked to three CE accounts, so. 00:43:26
That's that's something we can explore further and I've got all the data for that as well. 00:43:35
I'll be in fact, I'm gonna be bringing that to our next meet. 00:43:39
Thank you. 00:43:43
If you don't mind, I just want to add one couple of things there. 00:43:44
On the adaptation side of things, we leaned heavily on our local hazard mitigation plan. 00:43:48
Uh, which is a FEMA document or or a document we create to comply with FEMA? 00:43:55
Rules and regulations. 00:44:00
And you may be covered under the counties you know, Monterey Counties local hazard mitigation plan. 00:44:02
Um, I I'm not sure exactly how how it works for you, but but that is a great source of, you know what are the. 00:44:09
Natural disasters to expect and what are the plans in place to mitigate those, to address those to prepare for them? 00:44:16
So that's a huge source of of planning. 00:44:22
That that you can and should be looking at. 00:44:25
Uh. 00:44:28
We did add a few extra things in there that that we felt were not covered in the local hazard mitigation plan. 00:44:30
But it it was. 00:44:35
It took a. 00:44:37
It covered a huge amount of work that we wanted to do. 00:44:38
I would possibly hire a consultant at this point. 00:44:42
To help you answer the question of what kind of plan do you want for your city? 00:44:46
Because they will have the expertise to. 00:44:51
To guide you through the, the, the. 00:44:53
You know. 00:44:57
What does it mean to do secret qualification? What does it mean to do secret qualification? What? What are our options, depending 00:44:57
on how you you know that path? 00:45:01
And then the the last thing I I will say because I'm a huge fan of Central. 00:45:06
Central Coast Community Energy One of the actions we took as a community is to switch all of our city accounts from. 00:45:11
UH-23C E Prime, so just a. 00:45:19
From the regular. 00:45:22
Conventional 3C23 CE prime and what that meant for our city is. 00:45:23
Every. 00:45:27
City facility that's on a meter that that is that is getting electricity from from Central Coast Community Energy. 00:45:28
Is getting 100% renewable energy. 00:45:34
We're not just getting carbon free energy, we're getting 100% renewable. 00:45:37
We have not noticed. 00:45:41
Any you know, no one's complained about the the. 00:45:42
Slight increase in utility bills, but it's pretty phenomenal to just know that. 00:45:45
Every vehicle that plugs into a city owned electric vehicle charger. 00:45:51
Is getting renewable energy. Every time the lights go on, it's renewable energy and I think that that's pretty profound and the 00:45:55
process to do it took less than 10 minutes. It was a simple phone call to someone at 3C and that was it. 00:46:01
Yeah, I think that's a that's a great point I and I'm a little puzzled out of if we have 990 accounts. 00:46:08
Why haven't 35 have been moved over? Some of them may be. 00:46:14
Like industrial. 00:46:18
That. 00:46:19
Perhaps can't qualify under that program, but I I think that's probably it, yeah. 00:46:20
For instance, the Local Water project is probably the largest electrical user we've got. 00:46:26
In the city and that currently is a is a PG&E account, so. 00:46:32
That that does need to. 00:46:37
We do need to answer those questions, and I think that's something the subcommittee can do on its own. 00:46:38
Hi, Alex, I just wanted to thank you for your presentation and answering all these questions. It's really. 00:46:48
It's really helpful to sort of as you talk about like we're in Climate Action 3.0, right? We've moved through these different 00:46:54
phases and what are the. 00:46:57
Opportunities that we can we can grab on to as a community so I really appreciate just. 00:47:01
All that you shared, have you been through this whole process because you know you could? 00:47:07
Read these plans and they occurred at one point in time in a different landscape of either state. 00:47:11
Federal regulations that are going on and so I think that. 00:47:17
Just speaking a little bit about to like helping us navigate this, you just mentioned a consultant to help sort of what, what 00:47:21
direction we should go. I think also you know in the next couple of months a consultant to be able to help us. 00:47:26
Know what's already going on. I mean, we could do this as a committee or George could help us, but I I do think there's so much. 00:47:32
Movement in this that it would be helpful to know. 00:47:38
Even where we're gonna plug in. So I just, I think it's something maybe this subcommittee could talk about is. 00:47:42
Just, you know, Carmel Plan had a great. 00:47:47
A spreadsheet that sort of said, here's all of the things that we need to do and here's already plans that are already doing that. 00:47:50
I would love to see that even blown up a little bit more and include some of the state level. 00:47:56
And federal level things too. So just a big thank you for joining us today and sharing your knowledge and information. I have one 00:48:02
question about like community partners as we think about that. If you could speak just to a little bit about your experience, I 00:48:08
know it's different for each community and like but just more generally thinking about what that relationship is and. 00:48:15
And any lessons learned you have from that engagement or if you would recommend a particular partner in our community to really, 00:48:22
you know, try to build more of a relationship with around climate action planning. 00:48:28
Yes, uh, so I'll I'll answer the community question in a slightly odd way. 00:48:36
Start off with. 00:48:40
I'd like to think of the region as a community partner, so for me something I think. 00:48:42
Would make a lot of sense with his regional climate action plans, because the climate action plans. 00:48:48
Historically end up looking almost identical. 00:48:53
What about a Monterey Peninsula Climate Action Plan? 00:48:56
Would that be something that you could coordinate with the surrounding cities? 00:48:59
Because I think. 00:49:04
The actions that are taken in Monterey or in Seaside are getting look almost identical to what you're gonna take. 00:49:05
Especially if you take a conventional approach. 00:49:12
It's highly unlikely that there would be much variation. 00:49:14
But the the local community, the community partners. 00:49:18
There's some wonderful things that come out of that relationship. 00:49:22
We. 00:49:26
As a city, I think that's the reality check for us that we that we run into is we we had all these grandiose ideas we had. 00:49:28
A lot of difficulty getting community input because it was during COVID. 00:49:35
Our meetings were all virtual, they were very small and we were unable to get. 00:49:40
A lot of community input. 00:49:44
And what we're finding out later is, is things like. 00:49:47
You know the. 00:49:51
In our climate action plan, you know we thought that. 00:49:53
Rebates would be a huge thing that would just really make everything happen. 00:49:56
But what we're finding out through our community partners is that this is not happening for residents because they're they don't 00:50:00
have the capital to take advantage of rebates. 00:50:03
So that's something that we we've learned after the plan through our community engagement. 00:50:08
But community engagement can also be difficult to include. 00:50:13
Tiffany Wise W, who runs the city of Santa Cruz's Climate Action Program. 00:50:18
She got a lot of input about people wanting the plan to include. 00:50:24
Diet restrictions, Things like encouraging. 00:50:28
You know, a plant based diet, you know. 00:50:31
All kinds of things are on diet. 00:50:34
And as a city, there's this. 00:50:36
It's extremely difficult to. 00:50:39
To do anything about that, it's extremely difficult to. 00:50:41
Implement something that would actually encourage a plant based diet. 00:50:44
It's also a political nightmare. Nobody wants to be told what to eat. 00:50:49
And so you know. 00:50:53
She spent hours and hours and hours with groups. 00:50:55
You know yelling at her about you know, why is it? Why does he plan? Why did you ignore a comments about vegan diets? Why isn't 00:50:59
there a vegan thing in the in the plan? Why are you not pushing plant based diets so? 00:51:04
It's it's a difficult, uh. 00:51:10
Part of this whole process is is including public input and including public input that is. 00:51:13
Is helpful and meaningful and and. 00:51:19
And again, you don't really know when you're getting the input if it's going to be meaningful or helpful. 00:51:21
It's really only after the fact, but it's it's it's again that that robust public engagement process. 00:51:25
I am a believer in it, but it it's not always the easiest. 00:51:31
Part of this process. 00:51:36
And I think. 00:51:38
Clear expectations ahead of time. 00:51:39
May be a way to to preempt the unhappiness around groups that want something that cannot be included. 00:51:42
You know, just stating up front there are so many things that can and should be done, but at our city we are limited in what we 00:51:49
can implement. So please, just. 00:51:53
Take that into consideration. We'd love to hear what you have to say, but know that we can't do everything you tell us to do. 00:51:57
Thank you so much. 00:52:05
Any other? 00:52:10
Questions for Alex before we move on to our next topic. 00:52:11
Great. Well, thank you so much Alex, again for being here and for sharing so much knowledge and information that we have a lot to 00:52:17
think about and consider. 00:52:22
And we just really appreciate you as a thought partner in this process. 00:52:27
My pleasure. Thank you so much. Really appreciate it. 00:52:33
OK, OK. So moving on to our next agenda item, discuss Central Coast Community Energy services, the city's energy choices and 00:52:47
possible collaboration. 00:52:52
To encourage residents and businesses to participate in your agenda, you will see some background information about Central Coast 00:52:58
Community Energy, which we've heard a lot about just from Alex. 00:53:05
And one of the things that we would like. 00:53:11
Or one of the things that is a possible opportunity is to encourage residents to participate in. 00:53:16
Switching over to Central Coast Community Energy, about 90 some odd percent of our residents are on Central Coast Community Energy 00:53:24
and. 00:53:30
To have 100% enrollment, that would be a tremendous opportunity for our city. Another recommendation is for the city to switch 00:53:36
their electrical. 00:53:41
Or eligible electrical generation services from three C Choice to 3C Prime, which is all carbon free and sourced from solar and 00:53:47
wind. 00:53:53
By November 2023. 00:53:59
Collaborating with Central Coast Community Energy as well to develop an outreach program to encourage and to incentivize the 00:54:02
switch to 3C prime. 00:54:06
For residents who are interested. 00:54:11
So our discussion is about Central Coast Community Energy. They are our clean energy provider. They are a community choice 00:54:13
aggregate. 00:54:17
They are a not-for-profit organization and they serve the Monterey. 00:54:22
San Benito, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara and Santa Cruz counties. 00:54:27
We enrolled in or the City of Pacific Grove enrolled in 3C Prime or Nope Central Coast Community Energy. 00:54:31
Before when it was called Monterey Bay Community Energy, Umm. Back in 2018 I believe. 00:54:38
Probably. I think that's when Monterey Bay Aquarium made the switch, so that's when I am imagining. So did the city of Pacific 00:54:48
Grove. 00:54:51
And as of now, Three CE and its customers are on a pathway to 100% clean and energy and renewable energy by 2030. 00:54:56
And they are on target for 60% of that by 2025, which is just in a couple of years. 00:55:06
So this is up for discussion again the recommendation to switch to. 00:55:12
For the city to switch all of their eligible electrical generation services from Three C Choice to 3C Prime by November of this 00:55:18
year. 00:55:21
Oh. 00:55:30
Any comments from the public? 00:55:31
We have no hands raised, but we do have a representative from. 00:55:42
CE Judy Young. 00:55:46
Well, it's prepared to make a comment. 00:55:48
Ohh. 00:55:50
Judy. 00:55:51
Hi everyone, fascinating discussion and I was delighted to see Alex Yazbek. 00:55:53
And his presentation? He's one of my. 00:56:00
Local climate heroes. 00:56:02
Umm. 00:56:04
My name is Judy Young and I am the Senior Member Agency Account Manager with Central Coast Community Energy or three CE, your 00:56:05
local clean and renewable energy company. 00:56:10
Three CE is on track to source 100% renewable energy by 2030. 00:56:15
As has been mentioned, but making clean electricity available to our customers is only part of the puzzle. 00:56:20
An emissions free future requires decarbonizing, not just the resources. 00:56:27
That power our electric grid but all the buildings, vehicles and equipment that use energy generated by those clean and renewable 00:56:32
sources. 00:56:35
In addition to investing in new renewable energy and storage projects. 00:56:40
Funding and funding all new electric construction Three CE is committed to empowering our customers to use electricity. 00:56:44
For more of their daily energy needs, the growing number of electric vehicles may be the most visible sign of the electrification 00:56:52
of our Central Coast communities, and three CE rebates have helped put more EV's on the road, as well as funding charging stations 00:56:57
to support them. 00:57:02
But there are plenty of less obvious places where three CE customers can upgrade from greenhouse gas emitting equipment and 00:57:08
appliances to modern all electric versions in homes and businesses. 00:57:13
Heat pump technology can replace old-fashioned gas fired water heaters as well as traditional HVAC systems making. 00:57:20
Making buildings more efficient. 00:57:27
Bringing utility bills down and creating a healthier indoor environment. In the field, farmers are phasing out noisy, polluting 00:57:30
fossil fueled engines in favor of all electric agricultural equipment. 00:57:35
That is better for farm workers and for the farms bottom line. 00:57:41
And three, CE offers rebates for all of these electrification upgrades, with even bigger incentives for income, qualified 00:57:45
customers and small businesses. 00:57:49
We do this because fossil fuels are by far the largest contributor to global climate change. 00:57:54
Accounting for over 75% of global greenhouse gas emissions and nearly 90% of all carbon dioxide emissions. 00:57:59
In the US, the transportation sector accounts for nearly 30%. 00:58:07
Of greenhouse gas emissions, making it the largest contributor, and the built environment within the residential and commercial 00:58:11
sectors accounts for another 13%. 00:58:15
By helping the Central Coast make use of the clean and renewable power. 00:58:19
Our projects are putting onto the grid. 00:58:24
Central Coast Community Energy and our customers are using power for good. 00:58:26
Three CE welcomes the opportunity to partner with the City of Pacific Grove on meeting its Climate Action Plan goals. 00:58:31
Through our rebates and incentives, community outreach and programs designed to assist our member agencies advance 00:58:37
electrification. 00:58:40
In addition to this comment, I am available for questions or discussion. Thank you. 00:58:46
Thank you, Judy. 00:58:55
So open it up for discussion. 00:58:57
Ohh sorry, looks like we have a hand raised. 00:59:02
We do have one hand raised. I'll I will open the floor for Lisa Gianni. 00:59:05
Thank you. Well my comments very brief, I just I don't any, I don't know any reasons. 00:59:11
Why the city wouldn't? 00:59:17
Change to three CE. 00:59:19
3C prime or three CE prime. 00:59:22
I haven't done that yet. 00:59:26
But but I will be listening more and I am going to try to figure it out. 00:59:27
But it it sounds like a great idea and and I'm very interested in the discussion. Thank you. 00:59:34
Please. 00:59:46
Kathy. 00:59:47
OK, so at your first meeting I made. 01:00:02
To a couple comments, one was. 01:00:04
Take action. Don't spend time planning if you can take the action which I think you just heard from. 01:00:08
Alex is a way to go forward. 01:00:15
And the second one was don't do, don't. Let's not do this by ourselves. We're a small city. 01:00:17
There's all these partners out there, there's other governments. And so I think he made that point too. But I want to ask a 01:00:23
question, I guess. 01:00:27
Of the Rep from three CE. 01:00:32
Is it? Can I do that? 01:00:36
Is it possible for a city to opt up all of its accounts? Not just city municipal operations, but residents? 01:00:39
So in the city of Berkeley, we worked for two years. 01:00:46
With East Bay Community Energy, which was our CCA. 01:00:49
And. 01:00:53
Recognize that by opting up everybody in the city. 01:00:55
To the to the cleanest product. We were in the dirtiest product, which didn't make any sense for the city of Berkeley in that CCA. 01:00:59
So it took a long time. 01:01:03
But we opted up the city, opted up the whole city. All the residents in the city who, as you know, have the ability to opt out, 01:01:08
they have that right as the way CC's are set up. 01:01:13
So I have a question for. 01:01:18
Umm. 01:01:20
The Rep from three CE whether that's a possible possible approach in your service area as well. 01:01:22
Going 1 by 1 by 1 by 1 by 1, trying to get people to opt into the prime product is going to be impossible. 01:01:29
I don't know how many prime products there are right now in PG. Would be interesting to know, probably a handful. 01:01:36
A very motivated people who went and found out how to do that. 01:01:42
It's not that much more expensive. 01:01:45
And in fact, I was recently on a meeting with the. 01:01:48
Three CE. 01:01:51
Community Advisory Council. 01:01:53
Which is advisory to their boards. 01:01:55
There are different board structures. 01:01:57
And umm. 01:01:59
The guy that's the chair of that said three CEO's. 01:02:02
Fears for electricity? 01:02:06
Our. 01:02:09
At least 20% less than PG&E, so there's some wiggle room there to really work with three CE and maximize, moving as many people as 01:02:10
quickly as possible. 01:02:16
To 100% clean energy, or as close to it as we can get. 01:02:21
That will reduce our greenhouse gas emissions in this city more than any other single thing we can do. 01:02:26
So just consider a question for Judy whether that's something that cities in your service area can do as a city. 01:02:32
To make that choice. 01:02:40
And just for you to consider. 01:02:42
Thank you. 01:02:44
I'm not sure of the protocol. Shall I answer? 01:02:49
Yes, please. OK. 01:02:54
A community can opt up. 01:02:57
All of the. 01:02:59
Meters. 01:03:01
In the in the community. 01:03:03
The community can also, as you know, opt up all of your like. 01:03:05
Pacific Groves meters. 01:03:10
Umm. 01:03:12
We reckon we. 01:03:13
Would applaud if you wanted to move Pacific Growth Meters to our prime offering 100% clean and renewable energy. 01:03:15
Umm. 01:03:23
Anecdotally, we have seen that when a community OPS. 01:03:24
Up. 01:03:29
Its entire community that we see a lot of opt outs. 01:03:30
Particularly among our commercial accounts. 01:03:35
Umm. 01:03:38
And. 01:03:39
In addition, opting all of the city up to prime does not. 01:03:40
Do anything to address. 01:03:47
Umm. 01:03:49
Non electric sources of greenhouse gas emissions, like burning fossil fuels. 01:03:50
So there are. 01:03:56
There are other impactful measures that can be taken to. 01:03:57
Address climate and climate goals. 01:04:03
Beyond opting up the entire community. 01:04:08
Thank you, Judy. 01:04:16
Are there any questions for Judy? 01:04:19
Thanks so much, Judy. Well, since you put it out there, I would like to ask what are the other impactful measures besides opting 01:04:27
the city into the prime? 01:04:30
Umm. 01:04:35
And I I mentioned and I had written some down in my comments. 01:04:36
Focusing on. 01:04:45
Reach codes is an example and I didn't mention reach codes in my comments, so apologies but. 01:04:50
We have a program. 01:04:57
For our member agencies to pursue a reach code which would? 01:04:59
Move your building codes beyond the state of California's building codes. 01:05:04
There's many different types of reach codes that are being implemented across the state and across the country. 01:05:10
That advanced electrification. 01:05:18
And we have partnered with the consulting company to look at your individual. 01:05:20
Use case and recommend and help write reach codes that would work for you. 01:05:27
So in that way that that's the way that you could directly affect the amount of gas that's being burned in the buildings in and 01:05:33
and moving everybody to prime does not affect natural gas in any way. So that would be one example. We can also partner with you 01:05:39
to do community outreach. 01:05:45
Umm. 01:05:52
There there's a. 01:05:53
There's other rebates and incentives that that we offer as well. 01:05:56
So. 01:06:00
I and I think that Alex. 01:06:02
Is one of two communities of our 35 communities that have opted their meters up to prime and we have no communities that have 01:06:05
opted their entire. 01:06:10
Community up to Prime and again the concern there is the much higher rate of opt outs when a community does that. 01:06:15
Thank you. So it sounds like your recommendation would be maybe to opt up the municipal services where where the city pays for it 01:06:26
and then have the outreach and partnership with you to get people to willingly choose to opt in and then you find you have higher 01:06:30
adoption. 01:06:34
Adoption rates, would that be accurate? 01:06:39
I'm not sure it's my place to make a recommendation. 01:06:43
But that that would sound like a good plan and I also can mention that we are 9495% of our communities are opted in to to three 01:06:46
CE. So we all we do have a 4 to 5% opt out. 01:06:54
Automatically. Now some of those there's. There's really valid reasons, you know, for those and then. 01:07:02
For others, it's just people. People don't like the idea of clean and renewable energy, I suppose. 01:07:09
Um. 01:07:15
But we we wouldn't want to see that go down in your community by by opting up. 01:07:16
On behalf of the community. 01:07:24
Alright, thank you very much. 01:07:26
Thank you. Judy, quick question, I I heard it was mentioned 90% of PG customers are three CE rate payers, is that is that true? 01:07:30
I I think what I heard is. 01:07:41
9495% of the eligible customers. 01:07:45
In our territories have have stayed with three CE have not returned to PG&E for generation. 01:07:49
Is that what you asked? 01:07:56
No, although that's an interesting statistic. So once you get them, they stay with you. I guess the question is. 01:07:59
How much capacity is there here in Pacific Grove? 01:08:06
To switch to three CE, how many How many ratepayers in Pacific Grove are three CE ratepayers? 01:08:09
I thought I heard 90%. 01:08:15
Or do you have no so so basically you're you're it's it's the other side of the equation. I'm not sure what the opt out. 01:08:19
Rate is in Pacific Grove. 01:08:27
Across all of our territories, it's 94 to 95%. 01:08:29
And I believe it's it's in the same zone for Pacific growth. 01:08:33
Yeah, opt in. 01:08:38
Yeah, yeah. OK. 01:08:40
All right. Well, I guess this all comes to my next question, which is? 01:08:42
Who in the city are you dealing with as far as our, you know, our energy supplier, our energy. So I've. 01:08:47
Been able to identify 90 accounts that the city is responsible for paying. 01:08:58
And 35 of those accounts are PG&E accounts. 01:09:04
55 of them are three CE accounts, so that's. 01:09:08
You know, that's 38%. 01:09:13
You know that aren't actually. 01:09:16
You know, three CE customers, so who how can we get? 01:09:18
And who do you? 01:09:22
Deal with it the city for. 01:09:24
You know, making this analysis, figuring out how we can actually switch all these accounts over and are there good reasons that 01:09:27
we're not switched over, like are some of these high capacity? 01:09:31
Accounts like industrial accounts not eligible for three CE. 01:09:36
Right, so I actually ran an analysis and got a slightly different number I'm seeing 65 of. 01:09:41
Accounts 65 meters basically from the city of Pacific Grove are with three CE. I'm not sure the number that aren't, but I imagine 01:09:47
that they are St. lights and in some of those cases. 01:09:53
They simply are not eligible for coming to three CE for one reason or another. I can look into that for you and get back to you 01:10:00
because it's an important question, but I will also say that when the city of Pacific Grove. 01:10:06
Joined three CE the the process goes that everybody is automatic, every eligible account is automatically enrolled. 01:10:12
So I don't I I don't imagine that anybody at the city opted out any of your accounts. So I imagine that you were at 100% of 01:10:20
eligible accounts, but it's a good question and I will look into it and get back to you. 01:10:27
Yeah, that's it. I know we have 35 PG&E counts because I've got the data. 01:10:35
I was interested in actually looking at. 01:10:42
The actual usage and one of the nice things about the PG&E. 01:10:44
Uh. 01:10:47
Accounts as they give you energy consumption on you know, a 15 minute basis, you know. 01:10:48
You know, time period, so you can really get, you can really drill down into the data and see where the usage are. 01:10:55
Is that same granularity available? 01:11:01
With the BCE. 01:11:04
Yes, I've already ordered that report for you. 01:11:07
OK. OK, good. I've been trying to get that for a while. All right. So that's wonderful. Thank you. 01:11:10
Umm. 01:11:16
I do think you know. 01:11:17
Getting into Ohh, let's talk about cost first. 01:11:19
So I'm just online and I go to your 33C prime. It says it's .8 cents per kWh. 01:11:22
Additional is that correct? 01:11:30
It's point. There's an extra O in there. It's less than a penny per kWh. It's point O 8. 01:11:33
Right. And when I did a prime analysis for you, it looked like it would be about 8%. 01:11:40
Higher than choice. 01:11:46
Great. 01:11:49
So how many of our so assuming that it's true that most? 01:11:51
Pacific Grove ratepayers, R3 CE rate payers. 01:11:56
How many of them currently do you think are three C prime? 01:12:00
Ratepayers. 01:12:04
Hmm, that is also a good question. I don't. 01:12:06
I don't have that information in front of me, but I will look into that as well. 01:12:10
Thank you and and one last thing, if we do, if we do go to this, I don't see any reason why we wouldn't. 01:12:15
I want to get credit for it. 01:12:21
I want to say we reduced our greenhouse gases emissions by, you know, 10%. 01:12:22
So I think it would be important to partner with you to get the base current baseline. 01:12:30
To establish what we've achieved going to the new service. 01:12:35
And hopefully we can work with you on that. 01:12:38
Sure. 01:12:40
Thank you very much. 01:12:42
Thank you. 01:12:47
And thank you for bringing this forward this. 01:12:48
Just the simplicity of like this makes me wonder why. 01:12:51
This wasn't done earlier. 01:12:56
So Judy, actually a question for you. This is news to me like an impact, so powerful like Alex from Watsonville mentioned. 01:12:57
With such a smaller amount under consideration, why isn't? 01:13:07
3C Advertising this more often to other cities and counties. 01:13:11
To take this approach. 01:13:16
Well, to be honest, we're we are moving towards 100% clean and renewable for all of our customers and we will be there in a matter 01:13:18
of years. Our goal is 2030. 01:13:23
And. 01:13:29
So it it doesn't, there's not a real we would rather focus our outreach efforts on. 01:13:33
Electrifying. 01:13:41
Fossil fuel transportation vehicles, for example, you know, putting our outreach into things that are beyond the grid. 01:13:44
Makes a lot of sense. 01:13:53
So we don't, we don't discourage crime. We would love to have you come on over to prime for your meters. 01:13:56
Umm. 01:14:02
But it it, it isn't something that we are out telling everybody come, come on over, because we're we're heading there so quickly 01:14:04
anyway. 01:14:07
So by 20-30, everybody will be on 3C prime. Technically there's something of that sort. 01:14:12
Yeah. I think, I think the plan is 3C prime will just go away and everybody will be 100% clean and renewable. 01:14:17
OK. 01:14:26
That's great news, I. 01:14:27
Is it So we were talking about this opt in, opt out kind of items and it just struck me. 01:14:29
Seems like if if the whole community like opts in or kind of like did. 01:14:37
The whole community is subscribed to it. 3C Prime so to speak, mandatory. 01:14:42
And then you had a fallout of, like some folks getting out of that plan. 01:14:46
Umm. 01:14:51
Pacific Grove isn't. 01:14:52
So it's the 15,000 some folks already being on 3C prime. 01:14:54
Seems like the differential between 3C and 3C prime is roughly 8%. 01:14:59
Is there a way to for you to project what would be the entire cost? 01:15:04
For on an annual basis. 01:15:09
For the entire Pacific Grove to go on to 3C prime. 01:15:11
I can get that. 01:15:16
Analysis for you. 01:15:18
Yeah, I I want to see if if the city can take on. 01:15:20
The additional burden here. 01:15:25
Because I it seems like a. 01:15:27
It's a relatively kind of. 01:15:29
Smaller cost to absorb. 01:15:31
And. 01:15:33
Some folks may already be on 3C prime so so I'm just trying to understand where where the difficulties are. 01:15:35
And which while you're doing it if if you do not mind. 01:15:41
I would like to know which which of those accounts are drawing the. 01:15:45
Which of those accounts are commercial accounts like versus consumer accounts? 01:15:50
So we get a better handle to say. 01:15:55
Who, who can the city kind of like, incentivize if if we get there, that is. 01:15:58
I can look at that. 01:16:04
I I I really appreciate it, uh. But for coming back to the agenda item itself, I I think this there were three. 01:16:06
Kind of recommendations from from this agenda item I thought. 01:16:13
I think we need to probably split. 01:16:17
The question, so to speak, to say how, how we want to take action on each of those. 01:16:19
Because the the the latter 2 appeared to be more. 01:16:24
Or just like kind of like. 01:16:30
Routine items versus the first being. 01:16:31
Something that we're proposing to the City Council. So anyway that that's my suggestion. I'm supportive of of course, but just 01:16:34
wanted to make that observation. Thanks. 01:16:38
Yeah, just thinking through that a little bit more of making recommendations pretty specific for the city to go to, you know? 01:16:46
3C prime, but then how we do the follow-ups actions with? 01:16:53
Would be great if. 01:16:56
By our next meeting in November, if we had a little bit more information of where to do that, so my. 01:16:58
Would be sort of make a motion on the first one to recommend the city go to. We should be a leader in this. We should figure out 01:17:04
how much benefit that is and be you know. 01:17:08
Maybe. If it's not, you know, the biggest. 01:17:14
Thing we can do it. It is something we're doing to taking meaningful action. So I I would. 01:17:16
Make a motion to do that and then with more information that Judy seems available, we can really start to strategize better what 01:17:22
that means in the community, whether that's. 01:17:26
Updating the codes is a better approach versus the opt in all that sort of stuff so. 01:17:31
I won't make a motion if there's more discussion, but. 01:17:37
Point. 01:17:42
Inquiry, I guess. So we were asking City Council to direct staff to investigate that. Is that, is that what we're doing? 01:17:43
Yes, that's what we were doing and that's one of the reasons why we invited Judy to participate so that we could also get those 01:17:53
additional questions out there and. 01:17:58
I hope, yeah that's I'll believe that answer your question. 01:18:05
OK, so who would be bringing that is George. Are you gonna bring that to council then, George? Is that the idea? 01:18:08
I'm happy to facilitate and bring that to council on your behalf, OK? 01:18:14
Yeah, as long as we get Judy's. So we've given her a long list of questions. All those same questions are going to be asked at 01:18:18
City Council. 01:18:22
So if she can bring those to George and then bring those four to the council, that'd be great. 01:18:27
Thank you. 01:18:31
Council member Mccloudy. 01:18:32
A number of those questions I had asked of Judy and Central Coast Community Energy. 01:18:34
Ahead of this meeting, but I think it takes they have a week or two lead time to generate the reports and cross check the data. So 01:18:38
we have in this agenda item we have very rough estimates of what. 01:18:43
Based on 2022 usage. 01:18:49
Of kilowatt hours for the city. It would cost to upgrade the city facilities to Prime. 01:18:52
And then just add to a little clarification. 01:18:57
In addition to the street lights, which I don't think are eligible. 01:19:00
Part some of them because they. 01:19:03
Aren't actually physically metered. 01:19:05
You know, each of those street light is might be PG&E owned or might be city owned and it's a calculated value as opposed to a 01:19:08
metered value for whatever whatever reason, they're not eligible. And then I also think. 01:19:13
From the LED buyback program that the city is involved with where? 01:19:19
Through a PG&E program. 01:19:24
PG fronted the money to purchase a number of LED lights and were instead of paying for the electricity that we're not using, we're 01:19:27
paying back the cost of those LED lights. 01:19:31
Through that program. 01:19:36
That electricity. 01:19:38
Is not eligible for 3C. 01:19:39
Just one one other reason. 01:19:42
Thank you. 01:19:45
Well, I'll second the motion. 01:19:46
Will we get a roll call vote please? 01:19:49
Sure. 01:19:52
Committee member Midori. 01:19:53
Committee member Myers. 01:19:56
Committee member tips, Yes. 01:19:57
Committee member McKenna. 01:19:59
Aye. 01:20:01
Committee member McConnell, committee member Claudia Hi. 01:20:02
Motion passes unanimously. 01:20:06
Well, thank you, Judy, again for being here and for taking all of those wonderful questions. We very much appreciate it and would 01:20:12
love an opportunity to continue the dialogue with you and it sounds like you're in. 01:20:19
We are in great hands with you and George moving this charge forward. So thank you again for for being here and for participating. 01:20:27
We really appreciate it. 01:20:31
Thank you very much for having me and I will be in touch with George with the information you've asked for. 01:20:38
Thank you. 01:20:46
All right. So pending no other items on the agenda. 01:20:47
The last. 01:20:52
Item on here is that our next meeting is on November 16th. 01:20:55
Did we? 01:21:00
When we're did, we want to discuss the 2nd component of your recommendation, which was to collaborate? 01:21:02
And develop an outreach program. 01:21:08
Or are you? 01:21:10
Is that gonna just move forward along with the recommendation to move to prime? Yes, correct. 01:21:11
Hmm. 01:21:17
OK. Thank you for asking that question. Well, with that, I think we can adjourn this meeting. 01:21:18
Thank you everyone. Thank you. 01:21:26
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For the. 00:00:00
Dictation Subcommittee to Order. 00:00:02
Uh. 00:00:06
Is there a motion to approve the agenda for today? 00:00:09
I move to approve the agenda. 00:00:15
Great. 00:00:19
Do we need a? 00:00:21
Roll call vote. 00:00:23
For that. 00:00:24
For approval of the agenda, we're going to do a roll call, vote yes, sure. 00:00:25
Subcommittee member Literary. 00:00:30
Sub sub committee member Myers. 00:00:33
Aye Subcommittee member tips. 00:00:36
Subcommittee member McKenna. 00:00:39
Yes, subcommittee member McConnell. 00:00:41
Subcommittee member Cody. 00:00:44
Great. 00:00:47
Umm. 00:00:48
Are there any subcommittee or? 00:00:49
We'll start off with staff announcements first. 00:00:52
No self announcements. 00:00:56
Are there any subcommittee announcements? 00:00:58
Nothing. 00:01:03
Yeah, I just wanted to make folks aware that the Urban Ocean Lab, which is an incredible think tank. 00:01:03
Has put together ocean climate funding for coastal cities. 00:01:10
A whole list together that's based on. 00:01:15
Of it. 00:01:17
Funding available through the Inflation Reduction Act and outlines. 00:01:19
Deadlines, what grants to apply for, what they apply to, and who those contacts are. So I forwarded on to George SO. 00:01:23
Hopefully that will be on a future agenda for us to discuss, but you can go to the ocean. 00:01:29
Urban Ocean Lab website and see their guidebook. It's pretty incredible to see all of the. I think there's. 00:01:35
About 30 opportunities listed there. 00:01:40
Some of them don't apply, but many of them would. 00:01:44
No other comments from the submit. 00:01:51
Ohh, well, I I don't want to be too pedantic, but it's not officially a subcommittee. It's just a it's just a committee. 00:01:55
Understood. OK. 00:02:01
I know it says subcommittee, it does. But it's it's wrong alright committee. 00:02:04
Great. Thank you. 00:02:11
Any. 00:02:13
Comments from the public that are not relevant to the agenda. 00:02:14
OK. 00:02:27
So moving on. 00:02:29
Our approval of the Minutes. 00:02:32
From May. 00:02:35
Is there a motion to approve the minutes so moved? 00:02:37
All in favor. 00:02:42
Aye. Any opposed? 00:02:43
So approved. 00:02:46
Excellent. So then we are going to move on to item number six of the agenda. We have a presentation from Alex Yasbeck from the 00:02:49
City of Watsonville, who is the environmental projects manager. 00:02:55
Alex is joining us virtually and has done a tremendous job with Watsonville. 00:03:02
Umm. 00:03:08
Climate Action Plan. So we have invited him for this very informative presentation, which why we'll pass it off to Alex now. 00:03:10
Thank you. Thank you for having me. Really appreciate the opportunity. 00:03:20
Um. 00:03:25
Just wanted to check, can anyone see the the slides that I have? I'm not sure what is being presented right now. 00:03:26
Ohh, there we go. OK, I can see it. Great. So so my contact information is there and I would like to just encourage anyone who has 00:03:35
questions about anything I present tonight. 00:03:40
To reach out and contact me, I'm I'm always happy to discuss climate action planning. 00:03:46
In any. 00:03:51
Any questions that come up around it? 00:03:53
And uh. 00:03:56
So. 00:03:57
We can go to the next slide. 00:03:59
Um. 00:04:00
My. 00:04:01
Call in and speaking to you is to. 00:04:03
Give you some ideas of what can. 00:04:06
Be done when when it comes to creating a climate action plan, and I know this is a very dense slide and I apologize for only 00:04:09
having one, but hopefully by the time I go through it, it will make a little bit more sense. 00:04:14
I do want to just preface all of this by saying. 00:04:20
What I'm going to talk about is based on my experience developing a climate action plan for the city of Watsonville. 00:04:23
And my reflections after having adopted the plan. 00:04:29
Uh. 00:04:32
Some some thoughts that have come to me after. 00:04:33
You know, in the follow up to having had that plan put in place, I would definitely encourage this committee to look at other 00:04:36
cities climate action plans. 00:04:41
And to speak to other. 00:04:46
City. 00:04:48
You know people in my role at other cities so that that you can get some different opinions. I I do recognize that my. 00:04:49
Ideas around climate action planning are probably not. 00:04:56
As conventional as as most cities. 00:04:59
So with that said. 00:05:02
On the left there I have the conventional approach to climate action planning. This is also the correct approach, and by that I 00:05:04
mean. 00:05:09
Nothing in this approach is out of the ordinary. 00:05:15
Or. 00:05:19
Um. 00:05:20
Controversial in any way. 00:05:21
So a conventional climate action plan. 00:05:23
In California almost always follows the same. 00:05:26
Recipe. 00:05:30
A city does a greenhouse gas inventory. 00:05:31
And I think in the Ambag region we all get our greenhouse gas inventories from handbag that that is something that they. 00:05:34
Do they? 00:05:43
Received funding through whatever sources to prepare that for every. 00:05:44
Jurisdiction in their region once you have that inventory. 00:05:48
The city sets a target. For example, we want to be. 00:05:52
80% below our 1990 greenhouse gas levels by. 00:05:57
2030 or 2040, whatever that target is. 00:06:02
He then goes through the Capcoa methodologies. The Capcoa is the. 00:06:06
California Air Pollution Control Officers Association. 00:06:12
And they have come up with a methodology that assigns. 00:06:16
Greenhouse gas reductions to any measure as city adopts. So for example if you were to say. 00:06:20
We are going to install. 00:06:26
20 electric vehicle charging stations. 00:06:28
There's a Capcom method that says 20 stations, each one accounts for X amount, and there's a. 00:06:31
Big. 00:06:37
Modeling program and or. 00:06:38
Spreadsheet that goes along with this and and then it comes out and says yes if you do that. 00:06:40
You will. 00:06:44
Achieve a 3% reduction in your greenhouse gases by 2030 and so the CAPCO methodology is key to all of this and that you. 00:06:46
You quantify all of the things that you say you're going to do so that you can show that you can meet that target that you've 00:06:54
picked. 00:06:58
Once you have. 00:07:03
A pathway to compliance. You then get your plan. 00:07:04
Sequel qualified. I hope everyone in this room knows what sequel is. California Environmental Quality Act. 00:07:07
But a sequel? Qualified plan? Any plan a city adopts? 00:07:14
Is is meant to be sequel qualified? 00:07:19
And what that means is that you you have a realistic method to achieve and implement the plan. 00:07:22
It also means that if you as a jurisdiction fail to implement that plan, you can be taken to court. It is a legally binding action 00:07:28
that you're taking. 00:07:32
And so that's, that's the conventional approach. It typically takes 18 to 24 months. 00:07:38
And typically costs between 150 and $250,000. 00:07:43
And I'm including all of the. 00:07:48
All of the consultant fees that typically go into creating a conventional plan. 00:07:52
Uh. 00:07:56
And just to sort of further explain the conventional plan, typically everything in there is, there's strategies and measures and 00:07:57
those are all those things that have that associated greenhouse gas reduction. 00:08:02
That goes along with with. 00:08:09
Adopting the strategies and implementing those measures. 00:08:10
There's a lot of tracking of progress. Typically this kind of plan will have a website or a web app or some sort of dashboard. 00:08:14
To show how the jurisdiction is where the jurisdiction is in achieving that. 00:08:21
That those goals and how far along you are if you're on track, behind track, that kind of thing. 00:08:27
The big advantage of a conventional plan is it's enforceable. 00:08:32
So you know. 00:08:36
If there's something in there. 00:08:38
Um. 00:08:39
Staff would come to City Council and say. 00:08:41
We have committed to creating an EV. 00:08:44
Transition plan for our city fleet. 00:08:47
We need to do this. It's something that we have adopted. 00:08:49
And if you fail to do that, some environmental group could come to the city and say, look, this is in your plan. 00:08:52
It's SQL qualified. You need to be working on this to get it done. 00:08:57
The other thing with the conventional approach is the focus is always on greenhouse gases. 00:09:02
And this is something that I feel like is a new. 00:09:08
Area and climate action planning. 00:09:11
Historically, climate action has always been focused on. 00:09:14
Greenhouse gases, and not necessarily on. 00:09:18
Adaptation. 00:09:22
On sea level rise on. 00:09:24
Land use on. 00:09:28
You know, loss of habitat, biodiversity, those things were not part of climate action planning. It was always just on how can we 00:09:31
reduce our greenhouse gas emissions? 00:09:35
Because we know that there's negative impacts from the greenhouse gas emissions. 00:09:40
But it was typically not. 00:09:44
Very focused on on how to respond to those negative impacts. 00:09:47
Umm. 00:09:51
So. 00:09:52
The conventional approach, it is a great tool to create some change in the city, typically what comes out of that? 00:09:53
Conventional plan is a fleet electrification plan. 00:09:59
You know some I. 00:10:04
Deer run, organic composting or sorry, the composting of organics, EV charging, electrification, those kinds of things typically 00:10:05
come out of there. 00:10:10
And uh. 00:10:15
The reason I am no longer a fan of the conventional approach is that every city across the state who does a conventional 00:10:16
greenhouse, a conventional climate action plan. 00:10:21
Typically comes up with the exact same things. 00:10:27
And by that I mean we know. 00:10:29
Through our greenhouse gas inventories that. 00:10:32
Across the state, transportation is the biggest source of emissions. That is then followed by natural gas use in buildings. 00:10:34
And then followed by organics decomposing in landfills and then electricity used to be a big. 00:10:43
Source of greenhouse gas emissions, but because we're inside the three CE territory Central Coast Community Energy. 00:10:51
Our electricity is now extremely clean. It's mostly renewable. 00:10:58
It's almost 100% carbon. 00:11:02
Neutral. So electricity is no longer a source of greenhouse gases for our community. 00:11:05
Um. 00:11:10
And again, another reason I'm not a huge fan of conventional approach is because the state is passing laws that. 00:11:11
In a sense, force cities and jurisdictions to do the things that are typically identified in a greenhouse gas. Sorry, in a climate 00:11:18
action plan. 00:11:22
And some quick examples of those. 00:11:26
SB1383. 00:11:29
Requires that all cities compost their organics. 00:11:31
So if you're as a resident, I'm sure you've already. 00:11:35
I'm not exactly sure what's going on, but I imagine that something is happening where you are now. Composting your kitchen waste. 00:11:38
Composting your yard waste. 00:11:42
That's a state requirement. There's no way. 00:11:46
Around that. And whether you had a climate action plan or you didn't, you have to do that. 00:11:49
A similar thing is happening with fleet electrification. 00:11:53
There are new state laws saying that you have to electrify your fleet and you have to do it in this process and you have to show 00:11:57
that if you as a city are purchasing a new pickup truck. 00:12:02
You have to first try and buy an electric pickup truck. 00:12:08
If it's not available, you can then buy a gas one but. 00:12:11
The rules are there, they start to be in place on what has to be done. 00:12:14
EV charging is happening organically as as. 00:12:19
Companies just deploy EV charging in the community. It's there. 00:12:23
And a similar thing is happening with electrification. 00:12:27
At some point you as a resident will not be able to go buy. 00:12:30
A natural gas hot water heater because there will only be a heat pump hot water heater available in the store. A similar thing 00:12:35
happening with a. 00:12:39
Stoves cook tops. 00:12:44
At some point you will no longer be able to buy a natural gas. 00:12:45
Cooking. 00:12:49
Product you will only be able to buy an electric. 00:12:50
Version. 00:12:53
And. 00:12:54
I say that as a positive thing because it it really leads to the question of. 00:12:55
What is left for a city to do when it comes to climate action? 00:13:00
And so that's why switching to the right hand side of this slide. 00:13:04
I want to start thinking about the non conventional, innovative ways that cities can approach climate action planning. 00:13:08
And and my hope in this is that. 00:13:14
Something more innovative comes out of this process. 00:13:17
And that as a city, you actually end up doing more. 00:13:20
To address climate change than you would. 00:13:23
Had you taken the conventional approach? 00:13:26
Um. 00:13:28
So I would say, is there really a need for the city to do their your own greenhouse gas inventory? 00:13:29
Why we We know exactly what's in there. 00:13:36
We know what the answers are going to be before we even do it. We know transportation is the biggest source. We know all these 00:13:39
things. 00:13:41
So why spend all the money to have a consultant go through there to? 00:13:44
To. 00:13:49
Break it down to the, you know, decimal place. 00:13:49
You know Ohh transportation is 48.35%. It's not gonna change anything that the city does, knowing the accuracy that typically 00:13:52
comes out of this process. 00:13:57
And. 00:14:03
Again, the cap Co, a methodology, it's exciting, it's interesting, it's great. 00:14:04
But does it really get you towards knowing? 00:14:08
Ohh, it doesn't really get you to do actions you would not otherwise be taking. 00:14:13
And again, the sequel qualification. 00:14:17
It's an exciting thing, but I don't know if it really leads. 00:14:20
To those actions that that. 00:14:24
The city should be taking and that would actually lead to to real change in your community or community. 00:14:26
Um. 00:14:31
And again, if you took a non conventional approach, this could take anywhere from 2 to 12 months instead. 00:14:32
And the cost could be anywhere from 10 to 100,000 and again that's just a a guess on my part. 00:14:37
Um. 00:14:43
An example of this community that did not do a conventional approach is the County of Santa Cruz. 00:14:44
They chose to do a an approach that was not. 00:14:50
Sequel qualified. 00:14:54
I think they still use some of the Capcom methodology. 00:14:55
But. 00:14:59
Their approach allowed them to start looking at. 00:14:59
Land use in the county. 00:15:02
Uh, what does it mean? 00:15:04
It was more of a philosophical take on how do we really change the way we exist in this community to address climate change and so 00:15:06
moving away from that greenhouse gas focus. 00:15:12
I think this actually is a more exciting plan that they came up with. 00:15:18
Um, so one idea I had was is it possible to do? 00:15:23
For a city to adopt a list of climate action strategies. A list of climate action goals. 00:15:28
It's not a plan. It doesn't need to be SQL qualified. 00:15:33
But it does list all the things that the city should be looking into and supporting. 00:15:37
So, for example, something on that list could be electrify the city's municipal fleet. 00:15:41
It could be. 00:15:47
You know, advocate at a state level for. 00:15:49
Um, a phase out of gas appliances. It could be anything on that list. 00:15:52
There's a lot of freedom that comes with this. What are the focused areas that make sense for your community and what are the 00:15:57
focus areas that you would not, that don't do not make sense for your community? 00:16:02
Um. 00:16:07
If you. 00:16:08
As the community did not have control over. 00:16:09
Uh. 00:16:13
Your. 00:16:13
Your. 00:16:15
Wastewater treatment plant would be an example. 00:16:17
You can't really. 00:16:19
Make change happen at that wastewater treatment plant. 00:16:22
Because it's not in your control. So so I think. 00:16:24
A lot of this has to do with with with really looking at what can be done in your city. 00:16:28
What levers do you have to pull to make these changes, and and where should you be focusing your energy? 00:16:33
And again, I would say if you're gonna be focusing energy, you could then start bringing in things like environmental stewardship. 00:16:41
Coastline management, sea level preparedness, things that. 00:16:48
Don't really have a. 00:16:51
Greenhouse gas. 00:16:52
Reduction associated with them, but are things that as a community you can and should be doing to. 00:16:54
Be preparing for climate change and to be. 00:17:00
Limiting your your contribution to climate change. So again, you could start moving into things like deep sustainability, whatever 00:17:04
that means for your community. It does give you latitude to focus on adaptation, restoration. 00:17:10
Land use justice, equity, health, emergency response. 00:17:17
Again, it's. It's a much. 00:17:21
And again, I'm I'm going into the philosophy of climate change and climate action, but I think it's important. I think this is the 00:17:24
time if you're developing a plan. 00:17:27
And again it it. 00:17:31
Ask the question, what is the role of the state? What is the role of your community? 00:17:33
And I I've fully acknowledged that this is. 00:17:38
Not the conventional. 00:17:42
Look at climate action planning but. 00:17:44
I think it's worth looking into and I would look at every climate action plan that you can. 00:17:47
And speak to as many climate action. 00:17:52
Practitioners in the state to see what their look on this is or what their assessment of this is. 00:17:54
And again, if, if, if this was 2018 and I was talking to you. 00:18:01
I would be firmly in the conventional. 00:18:05
Side of climate action planning. 00:18:07
Just just, you know, five years ago. 00:18:09
That made a lot of sense because there were not yet those rules from the state. 00:18:11
That required all of these actions that we were already doing. 00:18:15
But now that it's 2023, I think. 00:18:18
That the the concept of a traditional climate action plan is not as valid as it was just five years ago. 00:18:21
So with that, I appreciate my the opportunity to say all of this. 00:18:27
I realize that's probably gonna be a lot of questions, so I'd like to. 00:18:32
Stop here and and open it up. 00:18:36
To to answer any questions that. 00:18:38
May be coming my way. 00:18:41
Any questions from members of the public? 00:18:46
One moment please. 00:19:05
We have a hand raised in the room. 00:19:07
You're welcome to come to the front. 00:19:11
And. 00:19:13
We'll set the timer for 3 minutes. 00:19:15
Hi. 00:19:25
Umm. 00:19:27
My name is Kathy Durbin. I am a relatively new Comer at a Pacific Grove, but I did a lot of work on the city of Berkeley's Climate 00:19:28
Action Plan, which started in 2008. 00:19:33
And went through some of the very stages that Alex talked about. 00:19:38
But I think in the last five years, cities have been moving towards doing what he he's talking about. So Alex, thank you very much 00:19:41
for your presentation. 00:19:45
I'm really excited about Watsonville. 00:19:50
Climate Action Plan and I think. 00:19:53
The piece that it starts with is a very strong commitment. 00:19:56
To doing climate action throughout your community and engaging people. 00:20:00
And partnerships. 00:20:05
And making a strong statement. 00:20:09
That you plan to get as close to carbon neutrality or negative carbon emissions as possible, so you have greenhouse gases. 00:20:12
In there. 00:20:20
Pretty centrally, even though I like kind of the additional kind of perspective you're you're approaching it through. 00:20:22
But I have a question about how your community did. 00:20:30
Reach agreement on that very strong commitment. 00:20:33
And very ambitious. 00:20:37
Umm. 00:20:39
Uh. 00:20:41
Statements in the plan and and how you feel like both the elected officials and the community are. 00:20:42
Respond have responded to that. 00:20:48
And are helping you actually achieve the goals that you've laid out. 00:20:50
Kathy thank you that that's that's a really. 00:20:57
Fantastic question I I I'm so happy you asked this. 00:20:59
So back in in 2018-2019 when we were working on our new Climate action plan update. 00:21:04
I was a firm believer in exactly what we. 00:21:12
What went into our climate action plan? Those those really ambitious commitments to greenhouse gas reductions? 00:21:15
It was something I I fully embraced. 00:21:22
And we were able to do that because we had the support of. 00:21:26
We had. 00:21:29
Three strong advocates on City Council at the time who were. 00:21:31
Absolutely committed to doing as much as possible and we had. 00:21:34
Two to three council members who were. 00:21:38
Moderate supporters and went along. And so we we were in this golden moment of a lot of support on City Council. 00:21:40
And and a lot of direction from City Council and we went with it. 00:21:46
And at the time it it felt fantastic it it really just seemed like we were doing the right thing. 00:21:50
And I don't think we did the wrong thing, but what I'm seeing now. 00:21:55
Almost five years later, is. 00:21:59
We have not had been able to. 00:22:01
To do the things that we need to do to to create that change. 00:22:05
There's the reality to climate action work, and that is. 00:22:10
Not everyone feels the urgency of it. 00:22:14
Not everyone feels that it's their role to be. 00:22:17
Doing this work, not everyone feels like. 00:22:21
The actions we're telling them to take are actually going to be meaningful in their lives or meaningful to climate action, change 00:22:23
to climate. 00:22:27
To stopping climate change. 00:22:31
Um. 00:22:33
So. 00:22:33
I've personally had a. 00:22:35
A change of heart, in a sense, in that. 00:22:36
I still believe that this is important, that it's part of it, that it's that it shows something, that it's useful. 00:22:39
But at the same time. 00:22:45
I don't know how to. 00:22:47
To get residents in Watsonville. 00:22:49
To get behind climate. 00:22:52
Action work, and so much of it is things like. 00:22:53
Residents feel trapped where they are. They don't feel like they have the luxury to do the things that we're telling them to do. 00:22:59
Evie adoption is a great example of that. 00:23:03
We know that it's cheaper to to drive an electric vehicle. It's cheaper to own an electric vehicle. 00:23:09