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A meeting to order it is Tuesday, May 21st, 2024 at 4:00 PM. 00:00:00
Let's take A roll call. 00:00:07
Commissioner Glenn. 00:00:11
Commissioner Brisson, present, Chair walking stick present. 00:00:13
Secretary Dunn. 00:00:19
Commissioner Rudin present. I believe we have, Commissioner. 00:00:21
Commissioner Myers and Vice Chair Rebecca Lee not in attendance tonight. 00:00:27
OK. Thank you. Let's move on to commissioner, subcommittee and staff announcements. Commissioners and subcommittee. Oh, whoops, 00:00:37
approved of. Why don't we move back one section and the approval of the agenda? 00:00:44
1st. 00:00:52
I so move. 00:00:54
I second. 00:00:56
Everyone in favor, aye? 00:00:58
Thank you for that. 00:01:02
Umm Commissioner, Subcommittee and staff announcements. 00:01:04
Commissioners. 00:01:07
Anybody. 00:01:12
OK, I have some. 00:01:14
I want to acknowledge and thank you to the George Washington Park maintenance crew and volunteers who came out last week and Road 00:01:17
Public Works mode, the perimeter and Zone 1, which is our recreation zone. It looks amazing and volunteers work side by side in 00:01:23
cooperation waiting around trees and native plants. 00:01:30
Really much appreciation for the collaborative efforts this year and stay tuned for more George Washington Park Community wedding 00:01:39
and planting events. Also, I want to mention that Carmel by the Sea has a Urban Forest Master Plan community meeting at the Sunset 00:01:45
Center tomorrow from 6 to 8. It's a great opportunity to observe the actions being taken by a local sister City for Force 00:01:51
management plan, so I thought I'd mention that today. 00:01:56
Are there any subcommittee announcements? 00:02:04
OK, let's move on to the staff. 00:02:08
Thank you, Chair Rocky Stick. A couple of updates coming from our Climate Action and Adaptation Planning Committee where we have 00:02:12
three Commission members from the BRC representing recently an RFP was reviewed for a second time and the finishing touches are 00:02:20
being worked out and we hope to put that out next month in June. And also an effort to upgrade the city's electrical services from 00:02:27
three C Choice and Three C Prime. 00:02:34
Which is an offering from Central Coast Community Energy to supply the city and you know city owned properties with 100% renewable 00:02:42
energy. All 100% wind and solar was passed at City Council. So going into effect I think this month the city will be purchasing 00:02:49
100% renewable energy where possible. And then a quick update on the Black Oyster Catcher Memorandum of Understanding with the 00:02:57
Autobahn at the recent Planning Commission meeting. 00:03:04
The the coastal development permit was granted. So now that MOU is in effect and ready to be implemented and we've already. 00:03:12
Put up some protective measures near Berwick Park, so if anyone is down there and you notice just some in one of the nesting 00:03:22
sites, that is a very probable site for this year. We have some rope and some signs warning the public away from the rocky Bluffs 00:03:29
where we expect a nesting pair to find a home. So that is. We'll continue working with Autobahn to follow that Mou and it's nice 00:03:36
to see that kind of finalized. 00:03:43
That's all I've gotten for today. Thank you. 00:03:51
So the first, the first announcement I had was that the Climate Committee has is finalizing an RFP and it expects to put out that 00:03:57
RFP a request for proposal for a consultant to help with the planning process in June. 00:04:04
The planning process of the Climate Action and Adaptation Plan. 00:04:13
Thank you. 00:04:18
And the second thing was that the? 00:04:20
City Council approved the upgrade of the city's energy services from three C Choice to 3C Prime, which is 100% renewable. 00:04:22
Thank you. 00:04:35
OK. And our council liaison is not with us today, so we can move to general public comment. 00:04:39
Who have one hand raised in the virtual audience. I'll open the floor for Lisa Chiani. 00:04:53
Thank you. It is. 00:05:01
Wonderful to have the Mou in place, finally to have the CDP, for it to have everything. 00:05:04
Set up now so that we can protect boys, black oyster catchers when when they nest in places that aren't aren't advantageous for 00:05:13
them and and it it it's, it's great to see. 00:05:21
Some fencing up at Berwick Park and and the. 00:05:31
Black oyster catcher pear that nests right on those Bluffs. They're not nesting yet but they're showing great interest and they 00:05:34
were resting this morning on those Bluffs. And so I'm I'm really excited for for this year and now all we need to do is. 00:05:44
And get our drone ordinance. 00:05:55
Revised so that we won't have all those recreational drones out there. I spoke to a gentleman this morning out at the Great Tide 00:05:59
Pool. 00:06:03
But last year, the MP Six pair. That's their Berwick Park. 00:06:09
Lost. 00:06:15
Two nesting attempts had two failed nesting attempts and and I think that drones had a huge amount to do with it. It was very very 00:06:17
frustrating situation but I think I think that must be coming up soon and and I thank you all so much BNRC members for for all 00:06:26
that you did to make make it possible to move the black oyster catcher Mou ahead thank you very much and George. 00:06:35
George was great at the Planning Commission meeting. Thank you. Thank you. 00:06:45
We have no further hands raised virtually. 00:06:54
OK. 00:07:00
Move on to written general public comment. Is there anything we need to be aware of? 00:07:05
OK. 00:07:14
Approval of the minutes. I have one quick thing under reference on the report here. I was the one that did Minutes for the last 00:07:15
meeting, so it was not Marty. But although Marty has helped me a lot through that very arduous task. So thank you. 00:07:25
And in addition to the correction that was noted in the public comment we received about a spelling of one of our speakers names, 00:07:36
I noticed one other correction needed on the top of page three, the second sentence, where it says 10 plus feet, I believe it 00:07:42
should read 10 plus trees. We were talking about development. 00:07:49
Actually, I'd like to further add to that piece. Elaborate on that. 00:07:58
I was hoping to change from consideration that development tree removal of 10 plus feet be seen before BNRC. 00:08:04
To be reviewed by City attorney for feasibility to again a little more detail with regard to any new development including 00:08:12
learning architectural footprint is expanded where 10 or greater than 1010 or greater than 10 trees native or non-native are 00:08:17
concerned. 00:08:23
Consider that being RCB added to the initial permit process alongside with architectural and planning boards. This is to be 00:08:29
reviewed by City Attorney. 00:08:34
For current feasibility and is not found within the MRC purview, it is to go forward to City Council for their consideration in 00:08:40
adding this to BMRC duties and responsibilities. 00:08:46
And that was a motion that passed 4:00 to 2:00. 00:08:52
So I can give you that. 00:08:59
Reading. 00:09:02
Not to tell. Thank you. 00:09:04
I have a correction. 00:09:08
To the spelling of our city manager, our new city manager's last name, there is no it's not more MORG. It's Mog. 00:09:10
Apologies for that and. 00:09:25
All notes taken, if you don't mind an interruption. You mentioned the general public comment and I just wanted to say that all the 00:09:28
written, general public comments are linked on the agenda. But historically we haven't read every written comment at the meeting 00:09:35
or mentioned them, but they are on the agenda available to the public on online. Thank you. 00:09:42
OK. Moving on to the regular agenda. 00:09:52
Oh yes, we do need to approve the Minutes, as the corrections lie, of course. Thank you. 00:09:58
We would like to move to approve the Minutes. I move to approve the Minutes with the corrections. 00:10:05
2nd. That. 00:10:10
All in favor. 00:10:12
Aye, aye. 00:10:13
OK. 00:10:18
Now moving on to a regular agenda. Thank you everybody for your help. 00:10:19
This afternoon. 00:10:25
7A is Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary water quality report. 00:10:27
By Lindsey Brown. 00:10:34
With a presentation. 00:10:37
OK, it's working. 00:10:43
Ays. 00:10:50
Thank you all for having me this afternoon. So I'm Lindsay Brown on the Water Quality Program Coordinator with the California 00:10:54
Marine Sanctuary Foundation on detail with the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. And I'm here to talk with you all about our 00:10:59
water quality monitoring programs and projects that we're doing here in Pacific Grove. 00:11:05
So first I wanted to quickly. Oh, next slide please. 00:11:12
First I want to. 00:11:17
Quickly touch on the California Marine Sanctuary Foundation. We're a nonprofit, I was established in 1995 and we've experienced 00:11:18
significant growth in the recent years. We focus on various marine areas, including marine resource protection, coastal 00:11:24
restoration, climate change mitigation and water quality protection. And within our water quality program, we address both urban 00:11:30
and agricultural concerns. 00:11:36
So my focus lies in urban water quality, assisting municipalities like Pacific Grove with stormwater permit compliance and 00:11:44
coordinating volunteer water quality monitoring programs in partnership with the sanctuary. 00:11:49
We also collaborate with the Monterey Regional Stormwater Education Alliance and the Monterey Regional Stormwater Management 00:11:56
Program as well. 00:12:00
And we call Monterey Regional Stormwater Management Program Mr. Swim for short. 00:12:06
They're they're a close partner of CMSF and the Sanctuary. And this is a conglomerate of six different cities and the County of 00:12:13
Monterey. And they meet monthly to discuss different storm water quality objectives. And the goals of this program is really to 00:12:19
mitigate pollution, investigate and enforce water quality issues, educate and inspect businesses, uphold Good Housekeeping 00:12:25
practices, engage the community and the design community. 00:12:31
And stormwater sampling as well. 00:12:38
Next slide please. 00:12:42
And we can do this by implementing several monitoring programs through different counties and cities including Pacific Grove. Next 00:13:14
slide please. 00:13:19
And more locally, along the PG coast, we have what's called an area of Special Biological Significance, otherwise known as an ASBS 00:13:25
that includes the Pacific Grove State Marine Conservation Area and Hopkins Marine State State Marines or Marine Reserve. An ASPs 00:13:31
is designated by the State Water Board in an effort to preserve unique sensitive marine ecosystems and they have their own subset 00:13:37
of state water quality protection measures, including the development of compliance plans to demonstrate that there is compliance 00:13:44
by permitted dischargers. 00:13:50
And part of this can be done through water quality monitoring, which my organization contributes to. 00:13:57
Slide please. 00:14:03
So I wanted to touch on all the water quality monitoring that we conduct in Pacific Grove, including our community science 00:14:05
programs such as First Flush and Snapchat Day and some additional city projects such as the storm water permit compliance and the 00:14:11
local water project. I'm going to touch on what each monitoring effort is, what we monitor and what results we found for last year 00:14:17
and any trends that we've noticed through these efforts. 00:14:23
Next slide. 00:14:30
So our volunteer water quality monitoring programs that we have in Pacific Grove are called First Flush and Snapchat Day. 00:14:32
Next slide. 00:14:39
First Flash is an annual water quality monitoring program where volunteers go out and take samples and field measurements at 00:14:43
different storm drain outfalls that eventually flow into the sanctuary during the first major rain event of the season. And this 00:14:49
rain event could happen at any time, so volunteers are put on call to be able to go out. 00:14:55
For example, last year volunteers went out in November on a Saturday at 4:30 AM. So we have very dedicated and amazing volunteers 00:15:01
that help us collect this data. 00:15:06
Next slide. 00:15:12
Stormwater quality matters because stormwater flows directly into our local waterways and is most likely not treated and therefore 00:15:14
can negatively impact local waterways. 00:15:19
Trash and debris can harm wildlife and reduce aesthetic bacteria and other pathogens. Our health hazard and can cause speech 00:15:24
closures. Household and commercial waste can impact wildlife and human health. Of course, erosion and sediment can also cause a 00:15:30
number of issues to aquatic health, such as clogging gills of fish, suffocating eggs and excess nutrients can cause a loss of 00:15:35
oxygen to the system. 00:15:41
Stormwater is also regulated through the Clean Water Act under the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System, otherwise the 00:15:48
known as the Nifty's permit. 00:15:52
And Pacific Grove is under the phase two permit for cities under 100,000 residents. 00:15:56
So this map says 2020, but we have been monitoring new sites in Monterey County since the 2000s and these are the same sites that 00:16:03
we monitored last year as well. The 13 sites for First Flush are located in Monterey County, in Pacific Grove, Seaside, Monterey 00:16:10
and Carmel. And then for Pacific Grove, we go to these five outfalls here in the top right and map 1 8th St. Greenwood Park, 00:16:17
Lovers Point C, Palm and Pico. Next slide. 00:16:24
So I wanted to share this image to include and include it so that you can see the sub watersheds of Pacific Grove and where the 00:16:33
storm water eventually ends up and enters the sanctuary and or the area of special biological significance. We have a lot of sub 00:16:39
watersheds going on and around 40 out falls. 00:16:45
Next slide. 00:16:52
So samples are tested for a lot of different analytes. For first flush, we have bacteria like E coli and Enterococcus, nutrients 00:16:55
like nitrate, phosphate, urine, ammonia, metals like copper, lead and zinc, detergents like MBA S, surfactants, sediment 00:17:02
velocraft, turbidity, total suspended solids, and other things that may indicate that there's a waste discharge like potassium 00:17:09
hardness and color. 00:17:16
Yes. 00:17:23
We did not. That would have been really interesting, though. Yeah. Thank you. 00:17:28
Next slide. 00:17:32
So results from this program are compared to water quality objectives or what I'll be calling them as Wqos. And these are set by 00:17:35
the Central Coastal Ambient Monitoring Program, the EPA, the Water Board and the Nifty's Ms. 4 General Permit. So for 2023, there 00:17:42
were a couple analytes of concern including bacteria, copper and surfactants. At Greenwood Park, there was a very high level of 00:17:50
human source bacteria that was noticed. 00:17:57
And high levels of bacteria can come from warm blooded animals such as squirrels, raccoons, possums and seagulls. It can also come 00:18:07
from pet waste or faulty sewer lines, so that may be where the humans source bacteria is coming from. We notice Enterococcus and E 00:18:13
coli results exceeded the water quality objective in all samples at all five sites in Pacific Grove. Copper exceeded the WQO at 00:18:20
8th St. and Pico. 00:18:27
Answer factor results also exceeded the WTO at all five sites in Pacific Grove. 00:18:34
So copper is present in like some brake pads, pesticides would preservatives, roofing materials and architectural structures such 00:18:40
as gutters and downspouts. So that may be the source of the copper. And then surfactants and water can indicate A discharge from 00:18:47
sewage or wash water, but can also naturally be found from eucalyptus trees as well. 00:18:53
And we're actually working with Mr. Swim in collaboration with the County of Monterey or County of Santa Cruz to assess some 00:19:00
additional monitoring we could do to identify the differences between the different surfactants to see if we could identify if 00:19:08
it's a natural source or human specific. But we're we're in the beginning stages of that that monitoring. 00:19:15
Next slide please. 00:19:23
And then I presented to this Commission last year, but just wanted to quickly reiterate the results from this. We had a 21 year 00:19:26
trend report for the first flush results and runoff water has water quality has generally improved over the past 21 years. 00:19:33
Concentrations of nitrate, copper, lead and zinc have decreased significantly and there's been no analyte concentrations that have 00:19:39
increased significantly. 00:19:46
So we are seeing an increase in water quality over the years. 00:19:53
Next slide. 00:19:57
This event is also used to engage and inspire stewardship and we really just want to teach volunteers about the sanctuary, how 00:20:36
they can enjoy it and teach them about water quality and science. 00:20:42
Next slide please. 00:20:48
So at each sets of volunteers take field measurements, which include water temperature, conductivity, pH, transparency, and 00:20:51
dissolved oxygen. Measurements. And then samples are also collected and sent to a lab to be analyzed for nutrients like nitrate 00:20:58
and ortho phosphate, as well as bacteria like E coli. Next slide and here's a map of all the sites that we visited last year and 00:21:05
this year for Snapshot Day, and they span four different counties and all those different watersheds that flow into the sanctuary. 00:21:12
Next slide. 00:21:20
For this program, we only have two stream sites in Pacific Grove at Greenwood Park and Asilomar State Park and these are indicated 00:21:22
by those those blue points on the map next slide. 00:21:27
So a couple of trends in Silver State Park site and Greenwood Parks that have been monitored for 23 and 22 years respectively. So 00:21:34
we have great long term data on those and the results are compared to the water quality objectives set by the Central Coast 00:21:41
Ambient Monitoring Program and the EPA similar to the first flush monitoring. Next slide. 00:21:48
Through our twenty year trend report for Snapshot Day, we found that Greenwood Park usually exceeds nitrate levels exceeding 89% 00:21:58
of the time. Asylum are is exceptionally lower only exceeding the nitrate WQO 11% of the time. 00:22:05
Orthophosphate is much frequently, much less frequently exceeding the WQO, with Greenwood Park exceeding 22% of the time and 00:22:14
Asylum are only at 5%. 00:22:20
Greenland Park has exceeded the E coli WQ every every year during snapshot and monitoring and sites, usually in high density urban 00:22:27
areas where animals, pets or there may be like some leaky septic systems that may be the source of the issue. And I know the the 00:22:34
city is focusing in on this bacterial contamination effort as well. 00:22:42
Even though there are exceedances at these two sites, they are rarely designated as areas of concern or sites. So sites that are 00:22:51
designated as areas of concern means that they have exceeded 3 or more analytes or field measurement water quality objectives. 00:22:58
Next slide please. 00:23:07
So our 2023 results show that Asylum are exceeded the WQO for dissolved oxygen and pH, while Greenwood Park exceeded for nitrate 00:23:10
and E coli. And we just recently had our 24th Annual Snapchat Day on May 4th this year. 00:23:17
And this year was a bit of an anomaly because it was raining pretty hard in the later part of the morning, which can obviously 00:23:26
impact those water quality samples. We have seen a lot more sites designated as an area of concern this year. We we think that's 00:23:32
due to the rainfall and what's coming off of the roadways. 00:23:37
For this year, a Selimar exceeded the WQO for E coli dissolved oxygen and pH, while Greenwood Park exceeded for orthophosphate, E 00:23:44
coli and transparency. 00:23:48
Since they both exceeded 3 or more Wqos, this would classify them as an area of concern. But of course we want to keep in mind 00:23:54
that the rain will change that water quality. 00:23:58
Next slide please. 00:24:04
Now I just want to quickly touch on a couple of projects that we're working directly with the city on, including the monitoring 00:24:07
for the MS-4 storm water permit and a small aspect of monitoring for the local water project. 00:24:12
Next slide. 00:24:19
So section E9C of the municipal separate storm and sewer system, otherwise known as the MS-4 permit, requires cities to conduct 00:24:22
annual sampling of any city outfalls greater than 18 inches that are flowing or ponding for more than 72 hours after the last 00:24:29
rainfall. So this is a dry weather sampling effort. Samples are collected from flowing out falls and are tested to help determine 00:24:37
the source of the discharge. So I went out last year to these 40 out falls that are labeled on the map. 00:24:44
And we actually only found nine that had flowing water last year. 00:24:53
Next slide. 00:24:58
So these samples are tested for the same analytes that we test for during first flush. So those nine out falls had the samples 00:24:59
taken for these analytes. Next slide. 00:25:05
And out of the 9 outfalls with flowing water, none of them exceeded the Nipty's miss four general permit requirements, so they are 00:25:12
in compliance for those. For the other analytes that are outside of the Nippies General Permit I. 00:25:19
The outfalls exceeded E coli, Enterococcus nitrate and orthophosphate. 00:25:27
Next slide. 00:25:33
Next, I want to move on to our work assisting with some water quality monitoring for the local water project here. So the city has 00:25:36
a shortage of potable water due to limitations on existing water supplies from the Karma River aquifer and seaside groundwater 00:25:43
basin. And the city used potable water for irrigation at the golf course in the nearby cemetery. 00:25:50
And so we contribute to this effort by testing water that could be used as a non potable source of water to use for irrigation 00:25:59
purposes. 00:26:02
For this we monitor water that comes from the pump station near Del Monte and Egan as well as crispy pond and we test for the 00:26:07
water for nutrients, chloride, sodium, total suspended solids, water temperature and pH. 00:26:13
Next slide. 00:26:22
So here are the results from last year it looks like. 00:26:25
We did a quarterly monitoring during last year, so Del Monte and Egan during the beginning part of the year I'm exceeded some some 00:26:30
nitrogen levels and then it consistently exceeded the criteria for sodium as well. And there was only one instance at the 00:26:37
beginning of the year that it exceeded those pH levels. 00:26:43
And then for Crespi Pond, which is the table on the right Crest, be pond seems to continually exceed chloride levels and it has 00:26:52
exceeded for nitrogen as well. 00:26:58
Has sodium and total dissolved solids. 00:27:05
Next slide. 00:27:09
And of course all this water quality monitoring fits into our local monitoring effort. I we work with the Monterey Regional 00:27:12
Stormwater Management program and we continue all of these projects yearly both through the community science programs that I 00:27:20
mentioned and through those cities specific projects as well. And I also work with different cities that are in the Mr. Swim 00:27:27
program along the peninsula to also help them implement solutions and to hear more about their water quality results. 00:27:35
So the next steps would be for, in my opinion, to continue to pursue management efforts that improve runoff water quality. You 00:27:46
know, continue those public education and outreach efforts, involve the public and clean up and sampling, eliminate illicit 00:27:52
discharges. 00:27:58
Develop guidelines and standards for construction runoff, which I know is being done with the Mr. Smith program. 00:28:05
Periodically cleaning out those storm drains and assessing sewer line integrity, especially at Greenwood Park. It's been a notice 00:28:12
through this presentation that it's had pretty high bacterial levels, but I know that this has been an issue in the past and the 00:28:21
city has been working on ways to implement improvements, but it it still remains to be high, the levels remain to be high. 00:28:29
I know that was a lot of information, but thank you so much for listening and let me know if you have any questions. Yes, we have 00:28:40
to go to public comment first. 00:28:45
I know I have it marked on my calendar here. Now let's kind of public comment. 00:28:51
We have one hand raised in the virtual audience. I'm going to open the floor for Lisa Gianni. 00:29:02
Thank you and thank you very much for that. 00:29:09
Very interesting report Lindsey. That was great. I couldn't fast enough but but I assume that I can listen to the recording of 00:29:14
this and also. 00:29:21
On your website. 00:29:29
What my question is about Crespi pond there I mean I'm a bird, a bird person and and the I mean the birds sun migration are just 00:29:32
marvelous there just as well as the birds year round. 00:29:40
That so I wondered if you have any specific recommendations for. 00:29:49
For how to improve the water quality in Crespi pond and what? 00:30:00
What what steps the city could do in in? 00:30:06
Conjunction with volunteers. 00:30:10
Yeah, that would. 00:30:14
Yeah, that's a really good question. So the sodium level specifically could be due to saltwater intrusion as well since it is very 00:30:17
close to the ocean and it has an action point. 00:30:25
And it has a connection point with the ocean. 00:30:35
But we do see some nitrogen problems which could be due just to the prox. 00:30:39
To the proximity of the golf course. 00:30:46
But I know that the city is focusing in on those efforts and that we can continue like monitoring for the during the to the pond 00:30:51
too. 00:30:55
OK, great. Thank you. 00:31:02
And we have another hand raised from Carmelita Garcia. 00:31:08
Good afternoon. Thank you all for your service and thank you for the presentation, Very, very informative. So my question lied in 00:31:14
the same vein as Miss Giannis about Crespi Pond. And so my question was the the higher levels what's causing them so? 00:31:24
I'm curious as to whether or not the. 00:31:37
The water plant next door might be part of that problem, and you did mention the golf course, so can you be more specific as to 00:31:41
what may be causing the golf course to be the cause of this, if at all? Thank you. 00:31:49
Yeah. Thanks for that question. So we have not done any source tracking efforts for this water quality monitoring. So I don't know 00:32:00
specifically where the specific analytes are coming from. So that would require some further looking into on where those specific 00:32:07
analytes are coming from. So I can't definitively say it's coming from the golf course. I can't definitively say it's coming from 00:32:14
wastewater treatment. So we'd have to do some further digging and some further analysis to look into that. 00:32:21
OK. 00:32:29
Yeah. 00:32:31
We have no further handles in the virtual audience and if you'd like to make a public comment. 00:32:38
Who's doing so at the diocese with a microphone? 00:32:42
Yeah. 00:32:47
Thank you for being understanding. 00:32:51
Sally Moore Yes, I know Greenwood Park has been a problem and they put a separator in a few years ago. Is that keeping a lot of 00:32:53
the solid waste out? Do you know that? Can you answer that? 00:32:59
That's a really good question. Yeah. So there are CDs units in place that. 00:33:06
Collect the trash that's coming in through the storm water system as well as some additional sediments and they filter that that 00:33:11
trash out and there also is a diversion in place as well. So during the dry weather months the the water coming into. 00:33:19
That could potentially go into the ocean is being diverted during the dry weather months. So it is not going into the ocean at 00:33:29
that time. But I believe during some some months in the wet weather season that that water is going directly to the ocean. But I 00:33:36
could George, if you have more insight into that and to clarify that the urban diversion system is operated year round now. It 00:33:42
used to just be operated during dry months and now it's kept on year round, but it's engineered to catch up to the 85th percentile 00:33:49
storm event. 00:33:56
So if you think of the you know 100 storm events, which I believe is when you get an inch of rain in a 24 hour period. 00:34:03
For the lower 85 of those, it'll catch all of the water and divert it into the sanitary sewer. But for the 15, the top 15%, or 15 00:34:11
out of 100 storm events, it's engineered to not have the capacity, and in that case it would overwhelm the diversion pumps and 00:34:17
would have flown to the Bay. 00:34:23
Thank you. 00:34:30
And I'll go into more detail on the later agenda item on that topic. OK, awesome. 00:34:33
Thank you. 00:34:39
Any commissioner comments or questions? 00:34:42
Pond So thank you. Thank you to Miss Yani too. 00:34:48
Just a quick reminder of the benefit of the virtual audience in the recording, but. 00:34:54
We've had some complaints about being able to hear the microphones and just if the light is on, you're muted. If the light is off, 00:35:01
you're not muted. And if you could speak directly into the microphone about a fist distance from your mouth, that would be ideal. 00:35:06
You can kind of hear in the room if it's picking up your audio, but just a friendly reminder to have everyone kind of keep that in 00:35:11
mind. Thank you. 00:35:17
Thank you. You know I love Mike mechanics, OK. 00:35:22
Any other Commissioner comments? 00:35:28
Yeah, I I just, I guess I have a general question about specific efforts or solutions for these areas of concern, but it sounds 00:35:35
like maybe George is going to be commenting on that. 00:35:40
Commissioner, Commissioner Person, the next agenda item is a presentation I'm going to give on Perfect the city's storm water 00:35:52
program. Thank you. So that will cover my question, it sounds like. 00:35:57
Or you can bring it up again there if it doesn't. I'll bring it up again there if I need to. Thank you so much. 00:36:03
OK. Miss Brown, thank you so much for coming and presenting with us. This information is very valuable and we appreciate 00:36:10
everything that you do with us. Thank you so much for having me. Thank you. 00:36:15
OK. Let's move on to 7B George first. Our Environmental Program Manager will be giving us a presentation on regional storm water 00:36:22
program update. 00:36:28
Bear with me one moment while I share my screen. 00:36:37
So Commissioners and Joe Logistic, I have here just a very broad overview of the Pacific Grove stormwater program and its 00:36:56
involvement in the regional program. 00:37:01
But I'm going to start with why does storm water matter? And apologies that some of what I'm going to say is going to overlap with 00:37:07
what Lindsey just said, but some of those seems obvious. But I think it's worth saying out loud, getting on the record storm water 00:37:14
flows directly to the local waterways. In most cases it is not treated. And that's especially important here with the Monterey 00:37:22
Bay. I think that we're all aware of the different protections it has and the importance it has to the natural wildlife. 00:37:29
And storm water pollution can negatively impact local waterways. Receiving water bodies, trash and debris can harm wildlife and 00:37:37
reduce aesthetic. 00:37:41
Bacteria and other pathogens can be a health hazard and cause beach closures. 00:37:47
Household commercial hazardous waste wastes in fact wildlife and people. Sediment harms aquatic habitat and downstream erosion can 00:37:53
further add sediment to the water bodies. And ** excess nutrients and loss of oxygen can be harmful to our. 00:38:02
Natural life as well. 00:38:13
Storm water efforts, a lot of it is the city and the volunteers and people doing what they think is right and but a lot of it is 00:38:17
mandated to regulate it. So a lot of what the city does is kind of following instructions of the state or the national national 00:38:24
government. So I'm going to try and touch on some of the basic regulations that the city has to abide by and it'll, you know, goes 00:38:31
back to 1987 when the Clean Water Act was amended. 00:38:39
And a designated municipal storm water runoff as a discrete pollution source. 00:38:46
In 1990, the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System. 00:38:52
Was put into law and it started as phase one permits and phase one applied to all cities above 100 and 1100 thousand. On the 00:38:57
Central Coast that was just Salinas. So today's day on the Central Coast we have the city of Salinas holds a phase one Ms. full 00:39:05
permit while all of the other cities hold phase two permits. 00:39:12
So that's just that system. That NPDS system was created by the US Environmental Protection Agency. It's administered and enforced 00:39:20
by State Water Resources Control Board. And there's nine regional boards. We are in Region 3, Central California. And then in 00:39:27
1999, the second phase was enacted. 00:39:34
For phase two permit cities, which included Pacific Grove having less than 100,000. 00:39:42
Residents. 00:39:48
And in 2003, the Monterey Regional Stormwater Management Program. 00:39:49
Affectionately known as Mr. Swim was formed and so that is a collaborative of the cities of Pacific Grove, Carmel del Rey, Oaks, 00:39:55
Monterey Sand City and Seaside and the county of Monterey. And I'm the representative from the city of Pacific Grove. So once a 00:40:02
month we go to the Monterey One Water offices out in Rhine Ranch and a representative from all of those cities and the county and 00:40:08
the and Monterey One Water who acts as the kind of facilitator of the group and has a dedicated staff for that to operate this 00:40:15
program. 00:40:22
Meet and discuss runoff issues and how we're going to implement the program components. 00:40:29
And it's the tasks that the city is required to do and that the city wants to do are so much more than what I as an individual 00:40:35
would ever be able to do. And by teaming up with all these cities, we're able to kind of utilize the budgets that we have and get 00:40:43
a lot more bang for our buck by working together. Because a lot of the requirements that we have are the same that all these other 00:40:50
cities have. So we're able to team up and much more efficiently accomplish these goals. 00:40:57
And those goals include mitigation, mitigating pollution at construction sites, investigating and enforcing illegal dumping, 00:41:05
educating and inspecting businesses. 00:41:10
Teaching and enforcing Good Housekeeping practices, engaging the community, promoting volunteerism, engaging the design community 00:41:16
and encouraging low impact development. And then all of the different storm water sampling programs. The first flush. 00:41:24
So MS-4 stands for a municipal separate storm sewer system. 00:41:33
So in Pacific Grove, we have separate conveyances. We have the sanitary sewer where all of the sewage of the city flows downhill, 00:41:39
and it used to flow to suffer Grove's own sewage treatment plant. So if you've ever noticed the kind of very cool looking Art Deco 00:41:47
buildings hidden behind Crespi Pond or hidden behind the 17th Tee box obscured by Cypress trees that used to be the sewage plant 00:41:54
for Pacific growth. 00:42:02
And it used to very minimally treat the sewage and then pump it right onto the Bay. So if you've ever walked out to the little 00:42:10
island, to the little Point Pinas Island and you've seen that big cast iron pipe stuck in the rocks, that's the old sewage out 00:42:16
outfall Pipe's. 00:42:22
But once the regional effort was underway to kind of combine all of the sewage of the peninsula and send it to Marina to the 00:42:30
Monterey. 00:42:35
That's the Monterey Wastewater Treatment District, which is now called Monterey One water, that facility was shut down and was 00:42:41
inactive for a couple decades or I think several decades and then just recently and I think 2017, it was brought back online not 00:42:49
as a sewage treatment but as a water project. So now some of the sewage in Pacific Grove goes to our water treatment project in 00:42:56
the that is housed in the former sewage treatment facility. 00:43:03
And that water is treated not to be potable water for drinking, but to be agricultural irrigation water. And the city uses that 00:43:11
water at the golf course and at the cemetery. And then also usually when we need to fill up water trucks. So like if we fill the 00:43:18
water Buffalo or if we need to fill up water for the street sweeper, when possible we use that water. 00:43:25
And. 00:43:32
By implementing that project, the city not was able to also acquire a bunch of water permits. So all the ADUS you see it going up 00:43:35
in town or all the people that are doing construction or are able to buy water permits. That's kind of a special thing that 00:43:40
Pacific Grove has where a lot of the other cities in the area don't have any extra water credits and haven't for a long time. And 00:43:46
the city Pacific only has those water credits available because we got them back when we switched the cemetery and the golf course 00:43:52
to using. 00:43:58
Water that we created from the Water Treatment project. 00:44:05
And then separately from the sanitary sewer which is all self-contained and is pumped, you know, gravity fed to the coast and then 00:44:12
pumped to, you know, pumped up at lift stations and then gravity fed and steps along the way all the way to Marina where it is 00:44:18
treated separately. We have our storm sewer system, the municipal separate storm sewer system which I'll refer to now is just 00:44:24
MS-4. 00:44:30
And that is not something that is universal through the city. There's some parts of the city that have no MS-4 system and most and 00:44:37
storm water just flows down our surface gutters. And then there's other areas where we have a pretty elaborate Ms. 4 system or 00:44:42
storm sewer system. 00:44:48
And the, the regulation that we referred to, NPDES has requirements for anybody or any entity that discharges into water bodies, 00:44:56
whether it's the ocean or a river or a lake. And if you're like, let's say, a construction project or a factory, you would have to 00:45:03
get an NPD EE S permit, a discharge permit. And then there's a special category of permits for cities, which are the MS-4 permits. 00:45:10
And then there's the two phases. 00:45:17
And then so phase one are the big 100,000 plus cities phase two or the smaller under 100,000 and then even amongst those MS-4 00:45:25
phase two phases, there's more I. 00:45:31
Breakdowns are traditional and non traditional small and isn't that. But to keep it simple Pacific Grove is a regulated small and 00:45:37
this for traditional permit. So Pacific Grove submits an annual report to the State Water Resources Control Board detailing 00:45:44
everything we do to be compliant with that permit and I. 00:45:50
If you're ever wondering if I'm. 00:45:58
If you're wondering what I do as the environmental program manager, about 80% of my job is probably this. It's a takes a 00:46:00
tremendous amount of time and it's a huge effort that includes Public Works, the Community development department and our building 00:46:06
officials and our code compliance Officer. And it's it's a big effort to maintain that permit with the State Water Resources 00:46:12
Control Board. 00:46:18
And some of the components, there are so many components to it that I can't touch on all of them. So I'm just going to kind of do 00:46:25
broad strokes. 00:46:29
A big part of what we do, and we do this part very much in collaboration with the Mr. Swim program, is public outreach and 00:46:32
education. 00:46:37
And that includes classroom programs. So we have, we work with Save the Whales Foundation and they do outreach at all of the local 00:46:42
auctions at all but all of the local schools that will have them. They go and give talks and you know, have a big inflatable whale 00:46:49
and bring all these props and explain to kids all about, you know, pollution and the importance of storm water. They table at all 00:46:55
sorts of events for us. So you know, if good old days and you know, not in San City and any sort of event that they can get get to 00:47:02
and they'll be there. 00:47:09
And then we work a lot with businesses, so and construction and that includes our building department insisting on certain best 00:47:16
management practices included on building plans and then our building officials being trained in the storm water regulations and 00:47:24
then regular inspections of certain construction sites just for their storm water practices. 00:47:31
And then also as a collaborative, we also fund the creation and dissemination of advertising. So after I get through this 00:47:40
PowerPoint, I can show you some of the recent television ads that we filmed here in Pacific Grove actually and are now airing on 00:47:48
all the local cable channels in both English and Spanish. And then also social media outreach. And there is a website, 00:47:55
montereyc.org that has detailed information for businesses for construction. 00:48:03
Industry people. 00:48:11
And for students. 00:48:13
And then another. 00:48:15
Thing that the city does in order to meet our MS-4 requirements is urban diversion as alluded to by Lindsey. And that is where we 00:48:17
capture storm water and separate the solids and divert the rest into the sewer system. And the main goal there is to reduce the 00:48:26
amount of Putin's going into the Bay. But a secondary goal is to add water to our sewer system that can be treated and reused by 00:48:35
Monterey One water, because all that water that goes into our sewer system and makes its way to Marina for Monterey run water. 00:48:44
Is that? 00:48:54
They treat, The first thing they do with it is treat as much as they can to the highest level and that gets reinjected into the 00:48:55
seaside groundwater basin for later use. So during wet months, they take as much treated water as they can and they inject it into 00:49:01
the ground and seaside. And if you've ever driven along General Jim Moore and you've seen the big pump stations and the pump 00:49:07
houses out there, those are mostly injection wells. 00:49:13
And that is kind of been the big water project that the Monterey Peninsula Water Management District has accomplished in the last 00:49:20
couple decades, is injecting treated water into the ground to mitigate saltwater intrusion and then to have that water stored for 00:49:27
the dry months that they can then pump it back out and use it. 00:49:33
And then they also treat water to a slightly less degree that gets sent out to the Salinas Valley for agricultural irrigation. And 00:49:41
then during really wet months, they exceed their potential to treat it for either of those uses and some water still gets treated 00:49:47
to a slightly lesser degree and gets pumped back out into the the ocean. 00:49:53
But the urban diversion system in Pacific Grove doesn't cover our entire watershed here. It roughly if you look roughly covers 00:50:00
from the aquarium to Sea Palm which is the majority of our ASPs the state designated area of special biological significance. So 00:50:07
and it covers our downtown area and the kind of the most densely populated areas. So most of that water is captured in our MS-4 00:50:14
system and is diverted into the. 00:50:21
Sanitary sewer and During the dry months it's close to 100% and then during the really rainy months it's set. It's designed to 00:50:29
capture a runoff up to the 85th percentile of storm events like I can try to explain earlier. 00:50:36
And the reason that they don't we don't have that as the 100 percentile is because it's for two reasons. One, it just wouldn't be 00:50:45
practical to build a system, you know the that would just you. It would be an oversized system that would only see use during the 00:50:51
most extreme weather events. 00:50:57
And the cost of that was 1 issue, but then another issue is during those really stormy high rain events, that's when we least need 00:51:03
the water, you know, because that's when Monterey One Water has all the water they could possibly use. So if we had designed the 00:51:10
system to go up to a higher than 85th percentile, which is an industry standard, it would be exceedingly expensive with 00:51:17
diminishing returns. And that's so that's that kind of, I hope that explains the 85th percentile. 00:51:24
And just so you kind of have a visual on what we're talking about here, here's some construction pictures of the urban diversion 00:51:33
cisterns or vaults where the water is caught in the storm drains. It is through a hydrodynamic separator, which is kind of like a 00:51:40
a centrifugal vortex that knocks down the solids and allows the liquid water to carry on. 00:51:48
And so here is the vault that is under one of the tea boxes in the golf course. And you can see some of these systems are massive 00:51:59
and if you didn't know, know you can see at the bottom, right? That's what it looks like. Now you wouldn't barely know it's there 00:52:06
because it's covered with a tea box and a fairway, but you have this kind of building size vault underground. 00:52:13
And that water is collected from the storm water system and then diverted into the sanitary sewer. 00:52:25
And then the sanitary sewer is conveyed to the regional treatment plant in Marina. 00:52:31
The edge of Berwick Park and that includes a vault that collects sewage and then when the vault fills up to a certain amount, the 00:53:09
pumps automatically turn on and pump. 00:53:15
The sewage up to the next kind of leg of its journey, where it can then use gravity to carry itself to the next lift station. 00:53:20
All the way to Marina. 00:53:30
And then a. 00:53:34
Another effort that the city takes in and you know as part of our MS-4 permit requirements is St. Sweeping. 00:53:35
And in the city of the City of Pacific Grove used to have full full time maintenance workers, city staff that and owned its own 00:53:45
St. Sweeping equipment. But it it's been decades now that we've contracted these services and currently we contract these services 00:53:52
with a company called Accent Clean and Sweep. And the RFP process for that contract most recently went to bid in June of 2022 and 00:54:00
just recently and the current contract is about $205,000 a year. 00:54:08
And that is has historically been funded entirely from proceeds of our green waste franchise agreement, a litter abatement fee. So 00:54:17
when everybody in town pays their trash bill for greenways to pick up their waste, 3.9% of those gross receipts gets put into a 00:54:25
fund for the city called the litter abatement fee. And that pretty closely has covered the street sweeping contract. So right now 00:54:33
the the city plays plays close to nothing for streets weeping. It's all covered by that. 00:54:40
Litter abatement fee and I think originally was designed just to meet kind of the minimum requirements of the Mississippi 4 00:54:49
permit. 00:54:52
And here I've got some. 00:54:58
Commissioner submitted photos of kind of areas in need of St. sweeping in town and by no means does the city think that our 00:55:00
streets sweeping efforts are perfect to keep all debris and all litter off our streets. But it is part of a combined effort to 00:55:08
keep their outfalls of, you know, things flowing into the Bay clean. And there is the way it's set up now, there are going to be 00:55:15
areas that aren't, you know, perfectly hit by the street sweeper. 00:55:22
I think most of these sites, depending on what part of town they are, will will be either filtered or separated in the storm 00:55:31
drains, or will be diverted entirely from the Bay. 00:55:37
And then I also think it's worth noting, looking around town and where I work at the public works office and the street sweeper 00:55:43
comes in, you know, three times at three times a week and all day is dumping his collection of St. sweeping. It's mostly organic 00:55:49
debris that the street sweeper is picking up. And we have a remarkably clean town. I'm not saying it's perfect, of course we have 00:55:55
litter and we have plastic and we have things, But compared to some other places, most of what the street super picks up is plant 00:56:01
matter. 00:56:07
And. 00:56:16
Some of the challenges that we have are timing. Ideally we would have the street sweeper come on a route the day after waste pick 00:56:17
up days and that is sort of the street trooper doesn't have to dodge all the bins on the street. And so that any trash or 00:56:25
recycling that falls out of the bin or isn't picked up perfectly from the trash truck can get picked up by the street sweeper. But 00:56:34
that creates problems because the the schedules it can be an issue and I think you know this schedule was. 00:56:42
This street sweeping schedule was created when we first started working with Accent Clean and Sweep many years ago and it hasn't 00:56:51
changed much. And since then I think that the green waste routes have changed and there's always going to be issues because the 00:56:57
Greenways drivers have their own holidays where they might shift a day and then our accent, you know, then the street sweeping 00:57:03
company has their own issues where maybe they have to do maintenance or they need to swap out a sweeper or swap out an employee. 00:57:09
So even at the best efforts. 00:57:16
Scheduling the streets we put to not interfere with waste pickup is a huge challenge, and it is time that the city sits down with 00:57:22
both green waste, the trash trucks, and the street sweeper and revisits this schedule. Because there's some notable places in town 00:57:27
where there's a conflict right now with waste pickup days, and that's an effort that Public Works is going to be making in the 00:57:33
coming months. 00:57:38
Another issue is encouraging parked cars not to block access. And some some cities some. 00:57:44
Especially big cities will have no parking signs in neighborhoods for St. sweeping days. So you you'll see a sign that says no 00:57:53
parking on, you know, Tuesday or of the month. The first Tuesday of the month are different things. But the reality is in Pacific 00:57:59
Grove, we don't have the manpower to enforce that. And we're not necessarily, I'm not sure that we have the willpower either to, 00:58:06
you know, people are so accustomed to parking. 00:58:12
Kind of when and where they want, and I think that would be a big ask. So it's all going to come out to come down to just 00:58:19
encouraging and doing the public outreach and teaching people the importance of moving their cars. 00:58:25
And there are, I think there are certain places in town where we have no parking on certain days like in the like behind like on 00:58:31
Mermaid Ave. where it's a really tight Ave. But for the most part we don't try and do that. And then obviously we have budget 00:58:37
limitations. Right now the street sweeping program is paid for almost entirely by the litter abatement fee. So I think any effort 00:58:44
to increase streets whooping that's going to be the biggest question is how we're going to pay for it. 00:58:50
I'm going to close this with. 00:59:00
Cartoon for Commissioner Dunn. 00:59:02
Tell me straight, are the micro plastics in my bloodstream recyclable? 00:59:06
And. 00:59:17
And then real quick too, I'm going to. 00:59:19
Share with you a video. 00:59:22
From the. 00:59:25
Mr. SWIP Swim Outreach Program. 00:59:29
Down here in Pacific Grove. 00:59:41
We tried to have a little bit of fun with it. 00:59:53
Actually see if I can get my volume to work one second. 01:00:00
I'll just show you the thumbnails so. 01:00:17
But this is just an example of some of the outreach that the Mr. Swim program is doing. So a whole collection of these short TV 01:00:25
ads, 3030 seconds each, using local kids that speak English and Spanish, pretending to be sports officials. So it'll be like 01:00:31
somebody putting out their cigarette **** and flicking it, and then the little soccer referee comes and gives him a red card. Or, 01:00:37
you know, different, different iterations of that. 01:00:44
About it and if you're more, if you're interested and you don't see them on TV, go to montereyc.org and you can see all of them. 01:00:52
And with that, I'm happy to answer any questions. 01:01:00
Thank you. Let's go to public comment first. 01:01:05
I. 01:01:10
Not have any hands raised in the audience. 01:01:14
OK. I'm sorry. Go ahead. 01:01:18
Excuse me, We do have one hand raised, so I will open it up to Lisa Chaney. 01:01:21
Thank you. I'm, I'm not sure this my question relates to this part, but just back on crispy pond where Lindsey said. 01:01:26
They have to, really. 01:01:41
Research. 01:01:43
To get more information about what specifically the pollutants are at Crestview Pond and I just wondered. 01:01:46
Who would do the research and how would it be funded? And if that doesn't apply now then then I'll ask you after the meeting. 01:01:55
Thank you. 01:02:05
We have no further hands raised. 01:02:12
OK, Commissioner, comments and questions. 01:02:15
First Secretary. Done. 01:02:20
Thank you so much, George. And I know you've put a lot of time into this and well done. Thank you. And I have a question and it 01:02:23
kind of ties into what Lindsey had said earlier. I, if I understood correctly, Lindsey said that the city has not been used, has 01:02:29
been using potable water at the golf course in the cemetery. But in your report you said that is either not the case or no longer 01:02:36
the case. 01:02:43
So since the local water project was brought online, the the golf course and the cemetery exclusively used non potable treated 01:02:51
sewage water for irrigation and that was how long ago it was in 2017. Thank you. 01:02:59
Commissioner Gorman. 01:03:11
Thank you. That was actually a very helpful presentation. And I was thinking if you guys do end up meeting to discuss the street 01:03:13
sweeper schedule, you know, if that ever does happen with the waste management and all of that. If it does change and I know 01:03:18
parking can be an issue, then then it would just be a matter of notifying residents I think in some way shape or form that their 01:03:24
date has changed in their neighborhood. Because I know, like I know oh, they're going to come on Friday. I better, you know, I do 01:03:30
think about it, not everybody does. 01:03:36
But that would be helpful if the schedule were to change in the future. 01:03:42
Secretary Dunn and to piggyback on that. 01:03:49
I think that umm, uh. 01:03:52
Waste Management's involvement could include having that information in the newsletters that they send out. 01:03:55
I know that I'm not really sure. I know when my street sweeping is what day it is, but I don't know how often and I. 01:04:03
So that would be really useful if we set up some sort of a grid if waste management can. 01:04:14
Yes, I. 01:04:22
Kathy Wooten, Commissioner Wooten, sorry. I was going to ask a question about the Greenwood Park flow because I know there's been 01:04:24
E coli and other bacterial contamination for many years and some time ago Public Works was going to do a sewage sewer assessment 01:04:31
because there must be leak somewhere. 01:04:39
The hill and I was wondering if that's in process or scheduled or if anybody's thinking about that? 01:04:48
Commissioner wouldn't definitely be thinking about that. And I think that the results of these alpha tests inform kind of how we 01:04:55
prioritize our kind of sewer rehabilitation project projects. And I know a section just above Greenwood Park was recently 01:05:01
rehabilitated, but it's not any any issues. So Greenwood Park has an outfall at the top of the park and then it kind of meanders 01:05:07
through the park on the surface and then it goes back into the storm drain at the end of the park and then ultimately gets 01:05:13
diverted into the sewer. 01:05:19
So, but that outfall at the top of the park isn't just fed by the, you know, the one block right up there. It's the whole 01:05:26
watershed all the way uphill, right. So identifying a leak or any issue, you know, possible cause of contamination is a tricky 01:05:33
proposition. And it's well known kind of the aging state of the sewer system in Pacific Grove. And it's something that council has 01:05:40
been putting, you know, tremendous funds toward. But it's it's a process. 01:05:47
And kind of segment by segment, our sewer program has kind of ranked the areas that need to be replaced and are is kind of working 01:05:55
diligently to do that. 01:05:59
OK. Thank you. And one other question and that is wasn't there a plan approved to put pipes down ocean view to use? 01:06:05
The non potable water from the treatment. 01:06:17
Or something that was discussed and it's always talked about his purple pipes. So yeah, when people generally when you have the 01:06:21
treated water that's portable, non potable, but technically it's treated enough that it would be safe to drink but nobody want 01:06:27
only anyone wants to drink it. So these purple pipes and whenever that's been floated, I think just the cost of installing the 01:06:33
pipes it would be. 01:06:39
Kind of a big hurdle there. When you look at the cost, the savings and the amount of for example Berwick Park, you look at how 01:06:47
much water is actually used for irrigation and the the cost savings there compared to the cost of running purple pipe. It just I 01:06:52
think the math didn't work out and that project did not get approved. 01:06:58
Thank you. 01:07:05
OK. I just have a couple of, I guess questions and comments. 01:07:10
Very interesting about the water credits, I didn't understand that or know that and I am happy to spread accurate information. 01:07:16
Thank you. Mike. I have a question about the potable water at the golf course and cemetery and through the water truck. Do we have 01:07:22
enough for? 01:07:28
Enough of the potable water to. 01:07:36
Adequately water those areas and yes, that's the question. 01:07:39
I think the general answer is yes, but there's some caveats. It depends like on these last couple of years it's been so rainy. We 01:07:46
haven't we've there's been kind of almost an excess of water. But I I do think that there could be dry years where maybe we we 01:07:52
wouldn't necessarily have enough water. And then there's all these issues with timing, but you know the the Water project operates 01:07:57
24 hours a day. 01:08:03
Ideally, but it's unable to operate at full capacity 24 hours a day because people aren't taking showers or flushing their toilets 01:08:09
as much at night time. So there are limitations to how much it can produce that fluctuate based on what you know the resident 01:08:17
residents are doing, you know, time of day and then time of year, various things. But my understanding is that it it's kind of 01:08:24
well matched right now where we have enough water for the cemetery and the golf course entirely. 01:08:31
And then a little bit of extra that we can use for other things, but delivery is an issue. 01:08:39
You know, getting the water to where we need to use it, it's it's expensive to drive a water truck and then you start to wonder, 01:08:45
is it worth? 01:08:47
You know, the greenhouse gas emissions driving a truck full of water, you know, when it's coming out to balance all of that. So I 01:08:51
think then the water truck uses usage is kind of an accessory thing and the main point of it was to irrigate the golf course in 01:08:57
the cemetery and that's it's accomplishing that very well. OK, wonderful. I'll flush my toilet more at night. So and then where, 01:09:03
where can we find more information or resources? So Monterey c.com and then for the street sweepers, where might we find that 01:09:10
information? 01:09:16
Childrenonac.org oh sorry. And the the city has a sub page for St. sweeping that has that route schedule and once doesn't have 01:09:23
that much more information. And then the contracting company Accent has there has a website, but it's kind of just a basic service 01:09:30
provider website. They'll provide sweeping services to other municipalities and construction sites. They're based out of Salinas I 01:09:37
believe. 01:09:44
So they have a website and the city has a a sub page for St. sweeping. Wonderful. Thank you. 01:09:52
That's all my questions. Anybody else? 01:09:59
OK. Thank you, Mr. First. That was a really wonderful and educational presentation. Let's move to agenda item 7. C We have a 01:10:02
presentation from Lacey Rake. Am I pronouncing your name correctly? Rock, I'm sorry. 01:10:10
From the California green business, What network? Thank you. Yeah, well, changing up the topic just a little bit, I had a good 01:10:20
crash course in stormwater. 01:10:25
Right. So you have the slides. 01:10:33
Right, OK. 01:10:38
One moment. 01:10:41
So as he's getting, oh, here we are. The California Green Business Network is a nonprofit organization that operates throughout 01:10:47
the state, providing free Technical Support to small and medium sized businesses. You can go to the next slide. 01:10:55
And we provide a framework and a checklist that businesses can use and as businesses go through the process. 01:11:04
We recognize and promote their accomplishments. 01:11:15
As well as sort of like bringing back that green Main Street, right. We've all I think seen the impact of the Amazon effect and 01:11:19
and all of these big businesses that come in, but especially in places like Pacific Grove where our local businesses are really 01:11:26
the heartbeat of our economy and our community, those are the businesses that we're here to support. 01:11:33
Next slide. 01:11:41
So if you were a business owner, you might have somebody reach out to you or you might reach out to somebody from the California 01:11:44
Green Business Network and enroll in the program. That's the very first step. And then a coordinator, and I have one with me today 01:11:51
actually. Jackie is a manager. She helps support the Monterey Bay area. 01:11:58
And so somebody like Jackie might come into your business and do an initial walkthrough. It's sort of like if somebody came to 01:12:06
your home and started supporting you with energy efficiency and water efficiency. We do it for small businesses. 01:12:12
So that's where the free technical assistance comes in and then our organization partners with other. 01:12:19
Agencies in the area like 3 CE, we've partnered with Storm Water in the past and region and green waste and then we work with the 01:12:27
businesses to implement the measures and then do a final site visit and verification and then we do a promotion. We recently had 01:12:34
an event in Salinas that was really well attended. 01:12:41
And it was done in both English and Spanish and we had some electives come and really celebrate the work that these businesses had 01:12:49
put into becoming a green business. 01:12:54
Next slide. 01:12:59
These are the sort of areas of focus that we look at. So as I was saying, when you come into a business, you'll let this support 01:13:02
in these these areas, energy, pollution prevention, solid waste, transportation, wastewater, water and then building community. 01:13:09
So each of these have their own sort of lists of sections that that or I'm sorry, list of questions that are associated with them. 01:13:17
And then the coordinator will help work with the business owner or the manager to go through all of these and identify what that 01:13:22
business might be able to do. 01:13:27
Before I move on, I just want to also add that as we work with local jurisdictions or agencies, we also bring in that like 01:13:34
individual touch, right? So I live in the city of Seaside and I helped pass their plastics ordinance and we worked when we were 01:13:41
implementing that ordinance to go door to door to businesses and we helped support them through understanding what the ordinance 01:13:49
meant, implementing the ordinance and then also going through the green business certification if they were interested in that. 01:13:56
When we have funding available, we've had state funding in the past and we also offer rebates. So it's a free service to business 01:14:04
and often they'll receive money for doing what they're doing as well. So it's a it's a great program. Next slide. 01:14:12
As I mentioned, there's fifty programs throughout the state. This just gives you an idea of the breadth and depth of the program. 01:14:22
Next slide. 01:14:26
So in Monterey County, I'll just focus sort of large picture here. First, we have 109 active green businesses, over 200 have 01:14:33
participated and we've had businesses over 20 enroll on their own just without any outreach. So there's been some good momentum. 01:14:39
Next slide. 01:14:44
And then in addition, when we're going through this checklist, we have both qualitative and quantitative questions and we track 01:14:52
and monitor the impact. So this is especially useful for communities that might have a climate action plan and they need to report 01:14:59
on strategies for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. So we track those emissions reductions, whether it's through changing out 01:15:06
your light system or HVAC system, transportation options for your employees. 01:15:14
All of those are put into this and then you can get a report for your city or for your business, for this county, the state 01:15:21
really, at any level. 01:15:26
And then we also track the. 01:15:32
Dollars saved as well. So you can see at the bottom of some of these little icons there's a. 01:15:36
Some financial estimates attached to each of the savings. Next slide. 01:15:41
So I wanted to give you just a little picture of some of the businesses in Pacific Grove that have had various levels of 01:15:47
involvement. Most of them you'll notice are not active. There's two that are that were certified and then just the certification 01:15:55
lasts for about three to four years. So their certification just ended and that's Happy Girl Kitchen and then the Wiki project, 01:16:03
which I believe has moved to San City. So there's a lot of opportunity for in Pacific Grove. 01:16:10
And there has been interest. 01:16:19
Next slide. 01:16:21
So just again to recap, this program is a valuable program in and of itself for the businesses, but it's also really valuable for 01:16:24
jurisdictions like Pacific Grove because it supports any individual ordinances or climate action plans. It supports state 01:16:31
requirements like SB1383 and it connects local businesses to resources that we have in the area that they may not be familiar 01:16:39
with, whether that's rebates from three CE or a different agency. 01:16:46
Prior to working with the California Green Business Network, I worked at CSU Monterey Bay as their Sustainability Director. And I 01:16:55
was just thinking about what George was saying of how, you know, 80% of his work is doing some of this compliance of the storm 01:17:02
water. There's always so much that we want our sustainability staff to do and there's just not enough hours in the day or the 01:17:09
week. And so programs like this also offer that extra boost that might be needed to support the programs. 01:17:16
For staff that might be really time constrained. Next slide. 01:17:23
I'm not going to read through all of these. You'll see them in your slide. It just lists some of the benefits to communities and 01:17:29
to businesses, most of which I've already discussed. Next slide. 01:17:34
And this is the same. This again lists some of the partners we worked with three CE, our haulers and we've also worked with 01:17:40
Communities for Sustainable Monterey County on their plastics policies and implementations. 01:17:46
Next slide. 01:17:54
This shows an example of how it can connect with climate action plans. I know you were mentioning that you're about to do the RFP. 01:17:56
The city I live in, Seaside, is also doing the same. So all of these are happening. One thing that our neighbor to the South, 01:18:04
Carmel, did was actually integrate into their climate Action Plan, a measure to support the California Green Business Network. And 01:18:11
I thought that was a really great tool because so much of what we do connects with the different sections within. 01:18:19
Umm, within the Climate Action plan, this is just a snapshot of some of the measures from the Monterey County draft plan. And then 01:18:27
you can see energy, transportation, water and solid waste. Those are all sections that we include in our certification. And then 01:18:33
the the ones below that are the measures that were in the county's plan and that are pretty common measures usually found in in 01:18:40
climate Action plans. Next slide. 01:18:46
I think that's it. 01:18:54
All right. I have some examples. As I mentioned at the beginning, we sort of partnered the California Green Business Network and 01:18:57
implementation of the Seaside plastic ordinance and that expanded actually from Seaside to other areas of the county, mainly 01:19:04
Salinas. And then we also started working with some daycares on safe cleaning supplies and day cares and reducing single use 01:19:12
plastic and daycare. So I'm going to these are the 2. 01:19:19
If I can, these are two case studies on restaurants. 01:19:27
The other is a case study on the daycares. And so some of the things you might see as you're looking through those is just you 01:19:36
know some of the features of the of the business itself like how many meals do they serve, Are they mostly in in person or to go 01:19:44
their dishwashing capacity. But you can also see both visually and through some of the metrics that are on those case studies. 01:19:51
Just the impact. I think we all get a little bit frustrated when we go into restaurants and we get you know a ton of. 01:19:59
Single use plastic to go where and we have that drawer that's just filled with all of that that we don't want. So as you look 01:20:07
through these, think about the businesses in your community that you might be able to develop a case study around if this was a 01:20:13
program that you're interested in supporting and having be in your community. 01:20:19
I'll turn it over to Jackie. Jackie is an amazing on the ground powerhouse that works directly with businesses and I know she'd be 01:20:27
happy just to share a little bit about the success stories and what it's like working with businesses directly. 01:20:34
Go ahead, Jackie. 01:20:42
Hi, everybody. Good afternoon. Thank you for introducing me, Lacey. So when we talk about success, one thing I really love about 01:20:44
the program is the fact that there's different ways to measure success, and it really does depend on what it is that you're 01:20:51
looking for. Perhaps a business doesn't necessarily care about the environmental impact, but they care about the savings that will 01:20:58
come from the program and then they'll just learn about the environmental impact in the process. 01:21:05
If a business truly just cares about, you know, what they're doing for the environment, that's another win. If we're talking about 01:21:13
the success when we present to the city, we can have those metrics reports like Lacey showed previously. So one of the really cool 01:21:21
things is that for us as coordinators, it's really important to get the basis of what we do, which is providing resources and 01:21:28
helping the businesses understand why we're there visiting them. 01:21:36
So one of the examples that I like to talk about is Our Lady of the Assumption Church in Pajero. So they recently got certified 01:21:44
and the reason I like to show them as an example of a success is because of the community reach that they have in Paro. Especially 01:21:51
after the recent flooding, it was really nice to help them certify but also spread the message to the people who attend the church 01:21:58
and have the connection between the church. 01:22:06
Up to $300 worth of reusables for a business to switch over from single use items for indoor dining to reusables. I know it may 01:22:48
not seem like a like a big impact, but when we look at those case studies that you have in front of you, you can really see 01:22:56
whether it's the amount of single use plastic items that were prevented from going into the trash or the amount of money that the 01:23:03
business saved during this, you know like the projected annual. 01:23:10
Success it's it's really nice to to talk about Reds Donuts and see that they started by taking advantage of the city you know like 01:23:19
the incentive. But then also went forward and actually accepted going through the certification process which was really cool 01:23:27
because they were our first certified business in Seaside through this partnership where we went in or I went in to talk to the 01:23:34
owners educate them on how the. 01:23:41
They were able to get paper products that were made from recycled content and didn't use chlorine to bleach them and make them 01:24:22
white. They also used it for a lot of their cleaning products that are certified by third party. 01:24:30
Organizations to make sure that there's ever an accidental spill. It's not going to harm the environment, but also to protect the 01:24:40
health of the employees that are using those cleaning chemicals. So there's a lot of great things about the program. 01:24:47
I can definitely answer more questions. Sorry if I if I talked a little bit too much, but there's plenty of examples to go around 01:24:54
in Monterey County alone. So if you can, you know, look at all of these different examples, we can see what we can do in Pacific 01:25:00
Grove. And just yeah, actually focus on what we want the education to be, whether that's the ordinance helping them meet state 01:25:07
mandates connecting them to green waste and ensuring that they have organics that they report any breaks in their dumpsters to 01:25:13
prevent the. 01:25:19
Umm, you know any toxic waste from going into the storm drains? Whatever it is, we really do try to encompass everything in our 01:25:26
certification process. 01:25:31
You, Jackie? 01:25:37
Yeah. I think I'd just also like to add that PG has never had a formal green business program in the past. Some of you maybe 01:25:40
wonder that they've sort of piggybacked on the county program. 01:25:46
And. 01:25:54
With we've lost state funding, as I'm sure all of you are aware of, the state is not in a good fiscal position this year or 01:25:56
probably next year. So we lost about 40% of our budget with the recent budget cuts and so. 01:26:03
One of the approaches that you know we're taking is to. 01:26:09
Come and talk to. 01:26:16
Communities like this and you know, if this is something that your value and that you're interested in, it's a really great 01:26:18
opportunity to meet a lot of the needs both environmentally and economically for the community. 01:26:25
We just had our state conference down in Southern California and it was my first state conference and it was remarkable to me to 01:26:33
see these different communities and what they can do when they invest in their green business program. Some of them were managed 01:26:41
by their economic development department, some of them were managed by a sustainability staff, if they had sustainability staff, 01:26:50
Some were through like renewable energy networks that sort of worked in a couple of jurisdictions. 01:26:58
So it can work in a lot of different ways depending on the community and as a resident of the Monterey Bay area, I just really 01:27:06
want to see this program thrive in this area. 01:27:12
Because if it doesn't, it'll go away. This year, unfortunately, we're really shrinking, as you can imagine, when you lose 40% of 01:27:20
your budget. 01:27:23
We sort of have been requesting funds from various jurisdictions and the normal membership process that communities do is it's a 01:27:30
$5000 flat fee and then a percentage of the number of businesses that you have for. So for this city of Pacific Grove, it would be 01:27:38
just under 5200 for the basic like membership level. 01:27:47
And then if you spend beyond that like the Seaside program was 15,000 when we did that effort. 01:27:57
In Sisa actually was closer to 30. Now that I think of it, it was like right below the amount that you need to go out through the 01:28:03
big RFP process. I think sort of kept it contained for that reason, but. 01:28:10
So there's a range of support that communities can give and obviously the more you give, the more you get. But that 5200 is sort 01:28:18
of the basic membership level. 01:28:24
I think we have to go to public comment first. 01:28:37
Embark on our questions SO. 01:28:41
If you are complete with your presentation. 01:28:46
I wanted to ask that first, so let's go to public comment. 01:28:49
We have one hand raised, Lisa Chiani. 01:28:54
Thank you. And thank you very much for that presentation. 01:28:58
I don't have a total hands on this, but I I I would it's. 01:29:05
Certainly something it would be great for the city to promote and I'm thinking for instance of a Sylmar State Park and and. 01:29:11
Their their cafe out there that's run by Aramark but but the whole the whole business is is run by Aramark and they used to in 01:29:23
their cafe have glasses, glassware. They didn't serve things in plastic. 01:29:32
Although, yeah, they do. So they do have sandwiches that are in plastic containers. But anyway, they used to have a sustainability 01:29:42
person working for them and I don't get the impression that that's the case now. And and I'm I'm concerned that, I mean, I finally 01:29:49
got someone to tell me that the reason they switched to plastic is because their dishwasher broke and they didn't want to fix it. 01:29:57
I don't know. 01:30:04
About that but. 01:30:12
Also you know they have all these trash bins that are great because they they latch and so you don't have trash flying out and you 01:30:14
don't you don't have the gulls and crows and whatever spreading it around but but I'm not and and they have diagrams on a lot of 01:30:24
them showing what goes where but but I'm wondering I hope it's not like the city where. 01:30:34
All our public trash cans along the coast. 01:30:44
Don't The recycle bins don't really mean it's going to recycling because people don't do a good enough job of sorting and so 01:30:49
everything goes to the trash. So I I I don't know how this would would work in PG, but I think it's a great idea. All right, Thank 01:30:56
you. 01:31:02
Thank you, Miss Siani, I think you just gave us a great example of a business that would benefit from the program, one of many I'm 01:31:11
sure within the community. 01:31:16
No further hands raised. 01:31:26
OK, if there's no further public comment, we will go to commissioner questions and comments. 01:31:30
I was kind of scribbling a lot of notes through that and thank you so much. Really great presentation was. 01:31:39
That about your estimating about $5000. Am I understanding? Is this an annual create? Yep, it's an annual membership. 01:31:46
OK. But to me sounds like a pretty great bargain, I just have to say. 01:31:54
I've actually worked in sustainability myself, so I appreciate that. I also like Carmel's recommendation. 01:32:03
To support it, kind of inserting it within their climate action plan and I don't know this seems pretty win win to me, supports 01:32:09
local businesses really like that and also assists the city really in supporting the environment which we were just kind of 01:32:17
discussing how difficult it is to. 01:32:24
Right. Pick up every piece of plastic. So I have to say, to me, this seems like a really kind of a steal at $5000 for all of our 01:32:32
businesses annually. So thank you so much. 01:32:38
Secretary Dunn. 01:32:51
Thank you also. 01:32:53
Come on. Thank you again so much. 01:32:55
If the city were to subscribe to the service, but your service statewide lost momentum, would our contract be invalidated? No. 01:32:59
No, I think the the organization will still exist. Monterey County has been a county or a region that has been supported a lot 01:33:12
through the state funds in the past to the tune of about $45,000 a year. So I'm trying to close that gap to the greatest extent 01:33:21
possible and asking for the county and various jurisdictions for the same levels of support. 01:33:31
And so I think even if nothing else comes through, right and PG is sort of the lone person with their hand up saying we support 01:33:42
that this is great. You will still be supported that membership level though is like you get access to the green business tracker, 01:33:50
you get the support from the region or from the statewide network. So the businesses will get after they go through the 01:33:58
certification, the clings in their windows and the advertisement and the promotion and the support. 01:34:06
What the added benefit when there's either more funding involved or more staff time involved is that there's more outreach for 01:34:15
communities. So beyond that sort of basic membership level like let's say did hit closer to that range of 15,000, then that means 01:34:23
that there's staff consultants within Cagbon, the California Green Business Network that would come, people like Jackie that would 01:34:31
come to the community, knock on the door and support them, do their follow up, do the technical assistance. 01:34:38
More proactively rather than sort of sending out some newsletters or something to then hope that it reaches the businesses. So 01:34:47
it's, you know, it's like most programs or memberships. It sort of steps up. Yeah. Yeah. Thank you. I. 01:34:56
OK, here goes. 01:35:08
What can we do as a committee to encourage the city to look at this? 01:35:10
Commissioner Dunn, I'll take a stab at that, Lacey. 01:35:20
Previously gave a similar presentation to our Climate Action and Adaptation Committee and I think that very well received amongst 01:35:27
that group, which includes membership of this Commission and council members. And I think the question of who in the city could 01:35:34
authorize this is City Council ultimately and they hold the purse strings and you know, approve kind of that type of thing. 01:35:42
So I think the next step would be for members of the Climate Committee and the BNRC, if they're so inclined, to take this to 01:35:50
council. 01:35:55
OK, before we take it to Council, I have questions too. 01:36:01
Commissioner, did you have anything you wanted to add? 01:36:06
Yes, I was just thinking that as we're now going out for the RFP, for the consultant, for the Climate Action Plan that it could be 01:36:09
something that could be rolled into whatever community outreach we do. 01:36:16
Or in some fashion associated with. 01:36:24
A climate action plan? 01:36:28
That would mean it wouldn't be immediate, but it would be a coordinated effort. 01:36:32
Similar to what, Carmel? 01:36:39
Is yes. Is that what you're? Yeah, I I agree with that, absolutely. 01:36:41
I you answered a lot. Thank you so much first of all for being here with us and explaining what your organization does and 01:36:49
absolutely I'm it's. 01:36:53
I think it's a wonderful thing. I do have a couple questions though about. 01:36:59
So when I went to the website and you did show a slide here that there were four businesses in PG currently utilizing the 01:37:04
California Green Business Network and what kind of outreach would be done to make other businesses aware of the services. You 01:37:11
answered that and then you've answered the cost of entry as well. There was one last thing though. I was at a local restaurant 01:37:17
just yesterday. 01:37:23
They had a green restaurant logo on their menu. 01:37:29
But it was for a different green business. It was for the restaurant, yes, green business. So how are you? I mean, besides just 01:37:34
being specific to restaurants, how are you as your organization different from that one, that organization I'm not particularly 01:37:40
familiar with? 01:37:46
Jackie, do you know, have we worked with the Green Restaurant Association in the past? You might know better than I do. You have 01:37:54
more history than me. So I only know about the fact that they're really focused on the restaurants sector. 01:38:00
So the thing that makes us different in that sense is that the sectors that that Lacey showed where we talk about energy, we talk 01:38:07
about pollution prevention through that certification, they may not talk about all of those or discuss or educate on all of those 01:38:14
because they like we don't just. 01:38:21
Focus on a restaurant measures. We focus on the whole thing like on a basis we we do and you know an office business checklist and 01:38:29
then add on top some restaurant specific measures. 01:38:36
As the restaurant certification is very focused on just the restaurant part of it. But yeah, yeah, I think that's true. I also 01:38:43
think one of the big differences that I notice is the community aspect of it, so. 01:38:53
I showed that map, right, of all of the different programs throughout the community, throughout the state. And the Green 01:39:03
Restaurant Association, to my knowledge is sort of like it's big, it's out there. You could probably go online, do the checklists, 01:39:09
maybe somebody calls you, I'm not sure. I can't speak that well to it. But what I can tell you about the California Green Business 01:39:15
Network is that Jackie, Brian, all of the staff like they live and work in these communities, right? I live in Seaside. I really 01:39:22
have. 01:39:28
A vested interest in the success of the program. And if I go into a restaurant that I know has gone through the green business 01:39:34
certification and they have, you know, plastic straws, I'm like, wait a second, I know this about you. And so there's that, that 01:39:42
sort of accountability and that nurturing, I guess that comes when it's part of a community rather than sort of a far away outside 01:39:50
agency. I will say though I didn't have a slide on this, but when I gave the presentation before. 01:39:58
I showed some just logos of other groups in the area that support this and. 01:40:06
And one was the Blue Zones project, you know and they have a Blue Zones restaurant certification. That program like we're mutually 01:40:11
supportive, they focus more on health and well-being whereas ours is sort of whole operations environmental perspective so. 01:40:21
That's one sort of difference between a local program. 01:40:31
Awesome, that's great. One thing I scribbled down here was personable and local. So you just covered that with the explanation and 01:40:35
the different within the differences. So love to support local and that answers my questions I. 01:40:44
Commissioner Gorman. 01:40:53
Do you have any or no? 01:40:55
Oh, OK. 01:40:59
Well, thank you again. I've had the pleasure of hearing you present twice now because I am on the site of the action committee. So 01:41:02
thank you for I know we requested you to come back as we do really love the idea for sure. One question before I have my other 01:41:08
comment, you mentioned now that you're working with Carmel partnering, is it considered so is it is the relationship a partnership 01:41:14
with this city or is it an agreement? I don't know how to find better? 01:41:19
So we've done a few different ways. It's I mean in terms of just transaction, it can just be like a service agreement or it can be 01:41:26
something bigger sort of depending on the scope. But usually if the community wants to participate, we sort of just sit down and 01:41:34
talk through what we want the scope to be. If if you're passing an ordinance and you want to make sure that the coordinators are 01:41:41
focusing on you know plastics policy implementation and we make sure that that's in there and then. 01:41:49
Go from there in terms of, you know, the transaction itself, but OK, yeah, great. Yeah, I think in light of with the city's 01:41:57
priority of environmental stewardship, our recent passing of the plastics ordinance and you know in our move forward with our 01:42:03
climate action planning that we are in the early phases of. 01:42:09
I would and, and I guess in support of what Commissioner Dunn had asked, what can we do to support, I'd like to make a motion. 01:42:17
So I was going to move to recommend that City Council move forward with the city partnering with the California Business Network 01:42:26
to support local businesses and conserving resources and becoming Green certified. 01:42:33
Think would be a great first step. 01:42:41
I would second that. 01:42:44
OK, let's take a vote. All in favor. 01:42:46
Aye. 01:42:51
And no opposed. 01:42:54
I guess we are going to City Council and in in support of your the Green Business Network. Thank you. On behalf of Jackie and the 01:42:58
whole team, really grateful for your support. Thank you. Thank you very much for you to be on board. Thank you. 01:43:05
OK, um. 01:43:16
Our next meeting is June 18th, 2024 at 4:00 PM right here. Would anybody like to move to adjourn the meeting? No, we don't do 01:43:19
that. OK? You want to stay here? 01:43:25
Oh shoot into what we've just voted on and thank you, Jennifer, Commissioner. 01:43:33
I personally, not surprisingly, I'm confused about something and I wonder if staff person first might consider a presentation at a 01:43:39
near future BNRC meeting on where we stand as a city with our plastics ordinance and with our climate action plan. To me it is 01:43:49
still I thought we had an active plastics ordinance and yet I can name restaurants, but I won't because I'm on tape. 01:43:58
That are still. 01:44:10
Using what I thought were outlawed. 01:44:11
Products and so I'm confused. 01:44:14
Go ahead, go ahead, Commissioner Dunn, and I'm happy to continue that conversation with you after the meeting. 01:44:19
I was thinking maybe as an agenda item we can definitely look ahead in our annual agendas and talk about that. 01:44:28
Like in a soon agenda, maybe? 01:44:39
I can definitely look into that for you. You're welcome. 01:44:43
OK. Anything else? 01:44:48
Can I get a motion to adjourn the meeting so moved? 01:44:53
Second all in favor, aye? 01:44:58
Aye, no opposed. 01:45:01
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A meeting to order it is Tuesday, May 21st, 2024 at 4:00 PM. 00:00:00
Let's take A roll call. 00:00:07
Commissioner Glenn. 00:00:11
Commissioner Brisson, present, Chair walking stick present. 00:00:13
Secretary Dunn. 00:00:19
Commissioner Rudin present. I believe we have, Commissioner. 00:00:21
Commissioner Myers and Vice Chair Rebecca Lee not in attendance tonight. 00:00:27
OK. Thank you. Let's move on to commissioner, subcommittee and staff announcements. Commissioners and subcommittee. Oh, whoops, 00:00:37
approved of. Why don't we move back one section and the approval of the agenda? 00:00:44
1st. 00:00:52
I so move. 00:00:54
I second. 00:00:56
Everyone in favor, aye? 00:00:58
Thank you for that. 00:01:02
Umm Commissioner, Subcommittee and staff announcements. 00:01:04
Commissioners. 00:01:07
Anybody. 00:01:12
OK, I have some. 00:01:14
I want to acknowledge and thank you to the George Washington Park maintenance crew and volunteers who came out last week and Road 00:01:17
Public Works mode, the perimeter and Zone 1, which is our recreation zone. It looks amazing and volunteers work side by side in 00:01:23
cooperation waiting around trees and native plants. 00:01:30
Really much appreciation for the collaborative efforts this year and stay tuned for more George Washington Park Community wedding 00:01:39
and planting events. Also, I want to mention that Carmel by the Sea has a Urban Forest Master Plan community meeting at the Sunset 00:01:45
Center tomorrow from 6 to 8. It's a great opportunity to observe the actions being taken by a local sister City for Force 00:01:51
management plan, so I thought I'd mention that today. 00:01:56
Are there any subcommittee announcements? 00:02:04
OK, let's move on to the staff. 00:02:08
Thank you, Chair Rocky Stick. A couple of updates coming from our Climate Action and Adaptation Planning Committee where we have 00:02:12
three Commission members from the BRC representing recently an RFP was reviewed for a second time and the finishing touches are 00:02:20
being worked out and we hope to put that out next month in June. And also an effort to upgrade the city's electrical services from 00:02:27
three C Choice and Three C Prime. 00:02:34
Which is an offering from Central Coast Community Energy to supply the city and you know city owned properties with 100% renewable 00:02:42
energy. All 100% wind and solar was passed at City Council. So going into effect I think this month the city will be purchasing 00:02:49
100% renewable energy where possible. And then a quick update on the Black Oyster Catcher Memorandum of Understanding with the 00:02:57
Autobahn at the recent Planning Commission meeting. 00:03:04
The the coastal development permit was granted. So now that MOU is in effect and ready to be implemented and we've already. 00:03:12
Put up some protective measures near Berwick Park, so if anyone is down there and you notice just some in one of the nesting 00:03:22
sites, that is a very probable site for this year. We have some rope and some signs warning the public away from the rocky Bluffs 00:03:29
where we expect a nesting pair to find a home. So that is. We'll continue working with Autobahn to follow that Mou and it's nice 00:03:36
to see that kind of finalized. 00:03:43
That's all I've gotten for today. Thank you. 00:03:51
So the first, the first announcement I had was that the Climate Committee has is finalizing an RFP and it expects to put out that 00:03:57
RFP a request for proposal for a consultant to help with the planning process in June. 00:04:04
The planning process of the Climate Action and Adaptation Plan. 00:04:13
Thank you. 00:04:18
And the second thing was that the? 00:04:20
City Council approved the upgrade of the city's energy services from three C Choice to 3C Prime, which is 100% renewable. 00:04:22
Thank you. 00:04:35
OK. And our council liaison is not with us today, so we can move to general public comment. 00:04:39
Who have one hand raised in the virtual audience. I'll open the floor for Lisa Chiani. 00:04:53
Thank you. It is. 00:05:01
Wonderful to have the Mou in place, finally to have the CDP, for it to have everything. 00:05:04
Set up now so that we can protect boys, black oyster catchers when when they nest in places that aren't aren't advantageous for 00:05:13
them and and it it it's, it's great to see. 00:05:21
Some fencing up at Berwick Park and and the. 00:05:31
Black oyster catcher pear that nests right on those Bluffs. They're not nesting yet but they're showing great interest and they 00:05:34
were resting this morning on those Bluffs. And so I'm I'm really excited for for this year and now all we need to do is. 00:05:44
And get our drone ordinance. 00:05:55
Revised so that we won't have all those recreational drones out there. I spoke to a gentleman this morning out at the Great Tide 00:05:59
Pool. 00:06:03
But last year, the MP Six pair. That's their Berwick Park. 00:06:09
Lost. 00:06:15
Two nesting attempts had two failed nesting attempts and and I think that drones had a huge amount to do with it. It was very very 00:06:17
frustrating situation but I think I think that must be coming up soon and and I thank you all so much BNRC members for for all 00:06:26
that you did to make make it possible to move the black oyster catcher Mou ahead thank you very much and George. 00:06:35
George was great at the Planning Commission meeting. Thank you. Thank you. 00:06:45
We have no further hands raised virtually. 00:06:54
OK. 00:07:00
Move on to written general public comment. Is there anything we need to be aware of? 00:07:05
OK. 00:07:14
Approval of the minutes. I have one quick thing under reference on the report here. I was the one that did Minutes for the last 00:07:15
meeting, so it was not Marty. But although Marty has helped me a lot through that very arduous task. So thank you. 00:07:25
And in addition to the correction that was noted in the public comment we received about a spelling of one of our speakers names, 00:07:36
I noticed one other correction needed on the top of page three, the second sentence, where it says 10 plus feet, I believe it 00:07:42
should read 10 plus trees. We were talking about development. 00:07:49
Actually, I'd like to further add to that piece. Elaborate on that. 00:07:58
I was hoping to change from consideration that development tree removal of 10 plus feet be seen before BNRC. 00:08:04
To be reviewed by City attorney for feasibility to again a little more detail with regard to any new development including 00:08:12
learning architectural footprint is expanded where 10 or greater than 1010 or greater than 10 trees native or non-native are 00:08:17
concerned. 00:08:23
Consider that being RCB added to the initial permit process alongside with architectural and planning boards. This is to be 00:08:29
reviewed by City Attorney. 00:08:34
For current feasibility and is not found within the MRC purview, it is to go forward to City Council for their consideration in 00:08:40
adding this to BMRC duties and responsibilities. 00:08:46
And that was a motion that passed 4:00 to 2:00. 00:08:52
So I can give you that. 00:08:59
Reading. 00:09:02
Not to tell. Thank you. 00:09:04
I have a correction. 00:09:08
To the spelling of our city manager, our new city manager's last name, there is no it's not more MORG. It's Mog. 00:09:10
Apologies for that and. 00:09:25
All notes taken, if you don't mind an interruption. You mentioned the general public comment and I just wanted to say that all the 00:09:28
written, general public comments are linked on the agenda. But historically we haven't read every written comment at the meeting 00:09:35
or mentioned them, but they are on the agenda available to the public on online. Thank you. 00:09:42
OK. Moving on to the regular agenda. 00:09:52
Oh yes, we do need to approve the Minutes, as the corrections lie, of course. Thank you. 00:09:58
We would like to move to approve the Minutes. I move to approve the Minutes with the corrections. 00:10:05
2nd. That. 00:10:10
All in favor. 00:10:12
Aye, aye. 00:10:13
OK. 00:10:18
Now moving on to a regular agenda. Thank you everybody for your help. 00:10:19
This afternoon. 00:10:25
7A is Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary water quality report. 00:10:27
By Lindsey Brown. 00:10:34
With a presentation. 00:10:37
OK, it's working. 00:10:43
Ays. 00:10:50
Thank you all for having me this afternoon. So I'm Lindsay Brown on the Water Quality Program Coordinator with the California 00:10:54
Marine Sanctuary Foundation on detail with the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. And I'm here to talk with you all about our 00:10:59
water quality monitoring programs and projects that we're doing here in Pacific Grove. 00:11:05
So first I wanted to quickly. Oh, next slide please. 00:11:12
First I want to. 00:11:17
Quickly touch on the California Marine Sanctuary Foundation. We're a nonprofit, I was established in 1995 and we've experienced 00:11:18
significant growth in the recent years. We focus on various marine areas, including marine resource protection, coastal 00:11:24
restoration, climate change mitigation and water quality protection. And within our water quality program, we address both urban 00:11:30
and agricultural concerns. 00:11:36
So my focus lies in urban water quality, assisting municipalities like Pacific Grove with stormwater permit compliance and 00:11:44
coordinating volunteer water quality monitoring programs in partnership with the sanctuary. 00:11:49
We also collaborate with the Monterey Regional Stormwater Education Alliance and the Monterey Regional Stormwater Management 00:11:56
Program as well. 00:12:00
And we call Monterey Regional Stormwater Management Program Mr. Swim for short. 00:12:06
They're they're a close partner of CMSF and the Sanctuary. And this is a conglomerate of six different cities and the County of 00:12:13
Monterey. And they meet monthly to discuss different storm water quality objectives. And the goals of this program is really to 00:12:19
mitigate pollution, investigate and enforce water quality issues, educate and inspect businesses, uphold Good Housekeeping 00:12:25
practices, engage the community and the design community. 00:12:31
And stormwater sampling as well. 00:12:38
Next slide please. 00:12:42
And we can do this by implementing several monitoring programs through different counties and cities including Pacific Grove. Next 00:13:14
slide please. 00:13:19
And more locally, along the PG coast, we have what's called an area of Special Biological Significance, otherwise known as an ASBS 00:13:25
that includes the Pacific Grove State Marine Conservation Area and Hopkins Marine State State Marines or Marine Reserve. An ASPs 00:13:31
is designated by the State Water Board in an effort to preserve unique sensitive marine ecosystems and they have their own subset 00:13:37
of state water quality protection measures, including the development of compliance plans to demonstrate that there is compliance 00:13:44
by permitted dischargers. 00:13:50
And part of this can be done through water quality monitoring, which my organization contributes to. 00:13:57
Slide please. 00:14:03
So I wanted to touch on all the water quality monitoring that we conduct in Pacific Grove, including our community science 00:14:05
programs such as First Flush and Snapchat Day and some additional city projects such as the storm water permit compliance and the 00:14:11
local water project. I'm going to touch on what each monitoring effort is, what we monitor and what results we found for last year 00:14:17
and any trends that we've noticed through these efforts. 00:14:23
Next slide. 00:14:30
So our volunteer water quality monitoring programs that we have in Pacific Grove are called First Flush and Snapchat Day. 00:14:32
Next slide. 00:14:39
First Flash is an annual water quality monitoring program where volunteers go out and take samples and field measurements at 00:14:43
different storm drain outfalls that eventually flow into the sanctuary during the first major rain event of the season. And this 00:14:49
rain event could happen at any time, so volunteers are put on call to be able to go out. 00:14:55
For example, last year volunteers went out in November on a Saturday at 4:30 AM. So we have very dedicated and amazing volunteers 00:15:01
that help us collect this data. 00:15:06
Next slide. 00:15:12
Stormwater quality matters because stormwater flows directly into our local waterways and is most likely not treated and therefore 00:15:14
can negatively impact local waterways. 00:15:19
Trash and debris can harm wildlife and reduce aesthetic bacteria and other pathogens. Our health hazard and can cause speech 00:15:24
closures. Household and commercial waste can impact wildlife and human health. Of course, erosion and sediment can also cause a 00:15:30
number of issues to aquatic health, such as clogging gills of fish, suffocating eggs and excess nutrients can cause a loss of 00:15:35
oxygen to the system. 00:15:41
Stormwater is also regulated through the Clean Water Act under the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System, otherwise the 00:15:48
known as the Nifty's permit. 00:15:52
And Pacific Grove is under the phase two permit for cities under 100,000 residents. 00:15:56
So this map says 2020, but we have been monitoring new sites in Monterey County since the 2000s and these are the same sites that 00:16:03
we monitored last year as well. The 13 sites for First Flush are located in Monterey County, in Pacific Grove, Seaside, Monterey 00:16:10
and Carmel. And then for Pacific Grove, we go to these five outfalls here in the top right and map 1 8th St. Greenwood Park, 00:16:17
Lovers Point C, Palm and Pico. Next slide. 00:16:24
So I wanted to share this image to include and include it so that you can see the sub watersheds of Pacific Grove and where the 00:16:33
storm water eventually ends up and enters the sanctuary and or the area of special biological significance. We have a lot of sub 00:16:39
watersheds going on and around 40 out falls. 00:16:45
Next slide. 00:16:52
So samples are tested for a lot of different analytes. For first flush, we have bacteria like E coli and Enterococcus, nutrients 00:16:55
like nitrate, phosphate, urine, ammonia, metals like copper, lead and zinc, detergents like MBA S, surfactants, sediment 00:17:02
velocraft, turbidity, total suspended solids, and other things that may indicate that there's a waste discharge like potassium 00:17:09
hardness and color. 00:17:16
Yes. 00:17:23
We did not. That would have been really interesting, though. Yeah. Thank you. 00:17:28
Next slide. 00:17:32
So results from this program are compared to water quality objectives or what I'll be calling them as Wqos. And these are set by 00:17:35
the Central Coastal Ambient Monitoring Program, the EPA, the Water Board and the Nifty's Ms. 4 General Permit. So for 2023, there 00:17:42
were a couple analytes of concern including bacteria, copper and surfactants. At Greenwood Park, there was a very high level of 00:17:50
human source bacteria that was noticed. 00:17:57
And high levels of bacteria can come from warm blooded animals such as squirrels, raccoons, possums and seagulls. It can also come 00:18:07
from pet waste or faulty sewer lines, so that may be where the humans source bacteria is coming from. We notice Enterococcus and E 00:18:13
coli results exceeded the water quality objective in all samples at all five sites in Pacific Grove. Copper exceeded the WQO at 00:18:20
8th St. and Pico. 00:18:27
Answer factor results also exceeded the WTO at all five sites in Pacific Grove. 00:18:34
So copper is present in like some brake pads, pesticides would preservatives, roofing materials and architectural structures such 00:18:40
as gutters and downspouts. So that may be the source of the copper. And then surfactants and water can indicate A discharge from 00:18:47
sewage or wash water, but can also naturally be found from eucalyptus trees as well. 00:18:53
And we're actually working with Mr. Swim in collaboration with the County of Monterey or County of Santa Cruz to assess some 00:19:00
additional monitoring we could do to identify the differences between the different surfactants to see if we could identify if 00:19:08
it's a natural source or human specific. But we're we're in the beginning stages of that that monitoring. 00:19:15
Next slide please. 00:19:23
And then I presented to this Commission last year, but just wanted to quickly reiterate the results from this. We had a 21 year 00:19:26
trend report for the first flush results and runoff water has water quality has generally improved over the past 21 years. 00:19:33
Concentrations of nitrate, copper, lead and zinc have decreased significantly and there's been no analyte concentrations that have 00:19:39
increased significantly. 00:19:46
So we are seeing an increase in water quality over the years. 00:19:53
Next slide. 00:19:57
This event is also used to engage and inspire stewardship and we really just want to teach volunteers about the sanctuary, how 00:20:36
they can enjoy it and teach them about water quality and science. 00:20:42
Next slide please. 00:20:48
So at each sets of volunteers take field measurements, which include water temperature, conductivity, pH, transparency, and 00:20:51
dissolved oxygen. Measurements. And then samples are also collected and sent to a lab to be analyzed for nutrients like nitrate 00:20:58
and ortho phosphate, as well as bacteria like E coli. Next slide and here's a map of all the sites that we visited last year and 00:21:05
this year for Snapshot Day, and they span four different counties and all those different watersheds that flow into the sanctuary. 00:21:12
Next slide. 00:21:20
For this program, we only have two stream sites in Pacific Grove at Greenwood Park and Asilomar State Park and these are indicated 00:21:22
by those those blue points on the map next slide. 00:21:27
So a couple of trends in Silver State Park site and Greenwood Parks that have been monitored for 23 and 22 years respectively. So 00:21:34
we have great long term data on those and the results are compared to the water quality objectives set by the Central Coast 00:21:41
Ambient Monitoring Program and the EPA similar to the first flush monitoring. Next slide. 00:21:48
Through our twenty year trend report for Snapshot Day, we found that Greenwood Park usually exceeds nitrate levels exceeding 89% 00:21:58
of the time. Asylum are is exceptionally lower only exceeding the nitrate WQO 11% of the time. 00:22:05
Orthophosphate is much frequently, much less frequently exceeding the WQO, with Greenwood Park exceeding 22% of the time and 00:22:14
Asylum are only at 5%. 00:22:20
Greenland Park has exceeded the E coli WQ every every year during snapshot and monitoring and sites, usually in high density urban 00:22:27
areas where animals, pets or there may be like some leaky septic systems that may be the source of the issue. And I know the the 00:22:34
city is focusing in on this bacterial contamination effort as well. 00:22:42
Even though there are exceedances at these two sites, they are rarely designated as areas of concern or sites. So sites that are 00:22:51
designated as areas of concern means that they have exceeded 3 or more analytes or field measurement water quality objectives. 00:22:58
Next slide please. 00:23:07
So our 2023 results show that Asylum are exceeded the WQO for dissolved oxygen and pH, while Greenwood Park exceeded for nitrate 00:23:10
and E coli. And we just recently had our 24th Annual Snapchat Day on May 4th this year. 00:23:17
And this year was a bit of an anomaly because it was raining pretty hard in the later part of the morning, which can obviously 00:23:26
impact those water quality samples. We have seen a lot more sites designated as an area of concern this year. We we think that's 00:23:32
due to the rainfall and what's coming off of the roadways. 00:23:37
For this year, a Selimar exceeded the WQO for E coli dissolved oxygen and pH, while Greenwood Park exceeded for orthophosphate, E 00:23:44
coli and transparency. 00:23:48
Since they both exceeded 3 or more Wqos, this would classify them as an area of concern. But of course we want to keep in mind 00:23:54
that the rain will change that water quality. 00:23:58
Next slide please. 00:24:04
Now I just want to quickly touch on a couple of projects that we're working directly with the city on, including the monitoring 00:24:07
for the MS-4 storm water permit and a small aspect of monitoring for the local water project. 00:24:12
Next slide. 00:24:19
So section E9C of the municipal separate storm and sewer system, otherwise known as the MS-4 permit, requires cities to conduct 00:24:22
annual sampling of any city outfalls greater than 18 inches that are flowing or ponding for more than 72 hours after the last 00:24:29
rainfall. So this is a dry weather sampling effort. Samples are collected from flowing out falls and are tested to help determine 00:24:37
the source of the discharge. So I went out last year to these 40 out falls that are labeled on the map. 00:24:44
And we actually only found nine that had flowing water last year. 00:24:53
Next slide. 00:24:58
So these samples are tested for the same analytes that we test for during first flush. So those nine out falls had the samples 00:24:59
taken for these analytes. Next slide. 00:25:05
And out of the 9 outfalls with flowing water, none of them exceeded the Nipty's miss four general permit requirements, so they are 00:25:12
in compliance for those. For the other analytes that are outside of the Nippies General Permit I. 00:25:19
The outfalls exceeded E coli, Enterococcus nitrate and orthophosphate. 00:25:27
Next slide. 00:25:33
Next, I want to move on to our work assisting with some water quality monitoring for the local water project here. So the city has 00:25:36
a shortage of potable water due to limitations on existing water supplies from the Karma River aquifer and seaside groundwater 00:25:43
basin. And the city used potable water for irrigation at the golf course in the nearby cemetery. 00:25:50
And so we contribute to this effort by testing water that could be used as a non potable source of water to use for irrigation 00:25:59
purposes. 00:26:02
For this we monitor water that comes from the pump station near Del Monte and Egan as well as crispy pond and we test for the 00:26:07
water for nutrients, chloride, sodium, total suspended solids, water temperature and pH. 00:26:13
Next slide. 00:26:22
So here are the results from last year it looks like. 00:26:25
We did a quarterly monitoring during last year, so Del Monte and Egan during the beginning part of the year I'm exceeded some some 00:26:30
nitrogen levels and then it consistently exceeded the criteria for sodium as well. And there was only one instance at the 00:26:37
beginning of the year that it exceeded those pH levels. 00:26:43
And then for Crespi Pond, which is the table on the right Crest, be pond seems to continually exceed chloride levels and it has 00:26:52
exceeded for nitrogen as well. 00:26:58
Has sodium and total dissolved solids. 00:27:05
Next slide. 00:27:09
And of course all this water quality monitoring fits into our local monitoring effort. I we work with the Monterey Regional 00:27:12
Stormwater Management program and we continue all of these projects yearly both through the community science programs that I 00:27:20
mentioned and through those cities specific projects as well. And I also work with different cities that are in the Mr. Swim 00:27:27
program along the peninsula to also help them implement solutions and to hear more about their water quality results. 00:27:35
So the next steps would be for, in my opinion, to continue to pursue management efforts that improve runoff water quality. You 00:27:46
know, continue those public education and outreach efforts, involve the public and clean up and sampling, eliminate illicit 00:27:52
discharges. 00:27:58
Develop guidelines and standards for construction runoff, which I know is being done with the Mr. Smith program. 00:28:05
Periodically cleaning out those storm drains and assessing sewer line integrity, especially at Greenwood Park. It's been a notice 00:28:12
through this presentation that it's had pretty high bacterial levels, but I know that this has been an issue in the past and the 00:28:21
city has been working on ways to implement improvements, but it it still remains to be high, the levels remain to be high. 00:28:29
I know that was a lot of information, but thank you so much for listening and let me know if you have any questions. Yes, we have 00:28:40
to go to public comment first. 00:28:45
I know I have it marked on my calendar here. Now let's kind of public comment. 00:28:51
We have one hand raised in the virtual audience. I'm going to open the floor for Lisa Gianni. 00:29:02
Thank you and thank you very much for that. 00:29:09
Very interesting report Lindsey. That was great. I couldn't fast enough but but I assume that I can listen to the recording of 00:29:14
this and also. 00:29:21
On your website. 00:29:29
What my question is about Crespi pond there I mean I'm a bird, a bird person and and the I mean the birds sun migration are just 00:29:32
marvelous there just as well as the birds year round. 00:29:40
That so I wondered if you have any specific recommendations for. 00:29:49
For how to improve the water quality in Crespi pond and what? 00:30:00
What what steps the city could do in in? 00:30:06
Conjunction with volunteers. 00:30:10
Yeah, that would. 00:30:14
Yeah, that's a really good question. So the sodium level specifically could be due to saltwater intrusion as well since it is very 00:30:17
close to the ocean and it has an action point. 00:30:25
And it has a connection point with the ocean. 00:30:35
But we do see some nitrogen problems which could be due just to the prox. 00:30:39
To the proximity of the golf course. 00:30:46
But I know that the city is focusing in on those efforts and that we can continue like monitoring for the during the to the pond 00:30:51
too. 00:30:55
OK, great. Thank you. 00:31:02
And we have another hand raised from Carmelita Garcia. 00:31:08
Good afternoon. Thank you all for your service and thank you for the presentation, Very, very informative. So my question lied in 00:31:14
the same vein as Miss Giannis about Crespi Pond. And so my question was the the higher levels what's causing them so? 00:31:24
I'm curious as to whether or not the. 00:31:37
The water plant next door might be part of that problem, and you did mention the golf course, so can you be more specific as to 00:31:41
what may be causing the golf course to be the cause of this, if at all? Thank you. 00:31:49
Yeah. Thanks for that question. So we have not done any source tracking efforts for this water quality monitoring. So I don't know 00:32:00
specifically where the specific analytes are coming from. So that would require some further looking into on where those specific 00:32:07
analytes are coming from. So I can't definitively say it's coming from the golf course. I can't definitively say it's coming from 00:32:14
wastewater treatment. So we'd have to do some further digging and some further analysis to look into that. 00:32:21
OK. 00:32:29
Yeah. 00:32:31
We have no further handles in the virtual audience and if you'd like to make a public comment. 00:32:38
Who's doing so at the diocese with a microphone? 00:32:42
Yeah. 00:32:47
Thank you for being understanding. 00:32:51
Sally Moore Yes, I know Greenwood Park has been a problem and they put a separator in a few years ago. Is that keeping a lot of 00:32:53
the solid waste out? Do you know that? Can you answer that? 00:32:59
That's a really good question. Yeah. So there are CDs units in place that. 00:33:06
Collect the trash that's coming in through the storm water system as well as some additional sediments and they filter that that 00:33:11
trash out and there also is a diversion in place as well. So during the dry weather months the the water coming into. 00:33:19
That could potentially go into the ocean is being diverted during the dry weather months. So it is not going into the ocean at 00:33:29
that time. But I believe during some some months in the wet weather season that that water is going directly to the ocean. But I 00:33:36
could George, if you have more insight into that and to clarify that the urban diversion system is operated year round now. It 00:33:42
used to just be operated during dry months and now it's kept on year round, but it's engineered to catch up to the 85th percentile 00:33:49
storm event. 00:33:56
So if you think of the you know 100 storm events, which I believe is when you get an inch of rain in a 24 hour period. 00:34:03
For the lower 85 of those, it'll catch all of the water and divert it into the sanitary sewer. But for the 15, the top 15%, or 15 00:34:11
out of 100 storm events, it's engineered to not have the capacity, and in that case it would overwhelm the diversion pumps and 00:34:17
would have flown to the Bay. 00:34:23
Thank you. 00:34:30
And I'll go into more detail on the later agenda item on that topic. OK, awesome. 00:34:33
Thank you. 00:34:39
Any commissioner comments or questions? 00:34:42
Pond So thank you. Thank you to Miss Yani too. 00:34:48
Just a quick reminder of the benefit of the virtual audience in the recording, but. 00:34:54
We've had some complaints about being able to hear the microphones and just if the light is on, you're muted. If the light is off, 00:35:01
you're not muted. And if you could speak directly into the microphone about a fist distance from your mouth, that would be ideal. 00:35:06
You can kind of hear in the room if it's picking up your audio, but just a friendly reminder to have everyone kind of keep that in 00:35:11
mind. Thank you. 00:35:17
Thank you. You know I love Mike mechanics, OK. 00:35:22
Any other Commissioner comments? 00:35:28
Yeah, I I just, I guess I have a general question about specific efforts or solutions for these areas of concern, but it sounds 00:35:35
like maybe George is going to be commenting on that. 00:35:40
Commissioner, Commissioner Person, the next agenda item is a presentation I'm going to give on Perfect the city's storm water 00:35:52
program. Thank you. So that will cover my question, it sounds like. 00:35:57
Or you can bring it up again there if it doesn't. I'll bring it up again there if I need to. Thank you so much. 00:36:03
OK. Miss Brown, thank you so much for coming and presenting with us. This information is very valuable and we appreciate 00:36:10
everything that you do with us. Thank you so much for having me. Thank you. 00:36:15
OK. Let's move on to 7B George first. Our Environmental Program Manager will be giving us a presentation on regional storm water 00:36:22
program update. 00:36:28
Bear with me one moment while I share my screen. 00:36:37
So Commissioners and Joe Logistic, I have here just a very broad overview of the Pacific Grove stormwater program and its 00:36:56
involvement in the regional program. 00:37:01
But I'm going to start with why does storm water matter? And apologies that some of what I'm going to say is going to overlap with 00:37:07
what Lindsey just said, but some of those seems obvious. But I think it's worth saying out loud, getting on the record storm water 00:37:14
flows directly to the local waterways. In most cases it is not treated. And that's especially important here with the Monterey 00:37:22
Bay. I think that we're all aware of the different protections it has and the importance it has to the natural wildlife. 00:37:29
And storm water pollution can negatively impact local waterways. Receiving water bodies, trash and debris can harm wildlife and 00:37:37
reduce aesthetic. 00:37:41
Bacteria and other pathogens can be a health hazard and cause beach closures. 00:37:47
Household commercial hazardous waste wastes in fact wildlife and people. Sediment harms aquatic habitat and downstream erosion can 00:37:53
further add sediment to the water bodies. And ** excess nutrients and loss of oxygen can be harmful to our. 00:38:02
Natural life as well. 00:38:13
Storm water efforts, a lot of it is the city and the volunteers and people doing what they think is right and but a lot of it is 00:38:17
mandated to regulate it. So a lot of what the city does is kind of following instructions of the state or the national national 00:38:24
government. So I'm going to try and touch on some of the basic regulations that the city has to abide by and it'll, you know, goes 00:38:31
back to 1987 when the Clean Water Act was amended. 00:38:39
And a designated municipal storm water runoff as a discrete pollution source. 00:38:46
In 1990, the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System. 00:38:52
Was put into law and it started as phase one permits and phase one applied to all cities above 100 and 1100 thousand. On the 00:38:57
Central Coast that was just Salinas. So today's day on the Central Coast we have the city of Salinas holds a phase one Ms. full 00:39:05
permit while all of the other cities hold phase two permits. 00:39:12
So that's just that system. That NPDS system was created by the US Environmental Protection Agency. It's administered and enforced 00:39:20
by State Water Resources Control Board. And there's nine regional boards. We are in Region 3, Central California. And then in 00:39:27
1999, the second phase was enacted. 00:39:34
For phase two permit cities, which included Pacific Grove having less than 100,000. 00:39:42
Residents. 00:39:48
And in 2003, the Monterey Regional Stormwater Management Program. 00:39:49
Affectionately known as Mr. Swim was formed and so that is a collaborative of the cities of Pacific Grove, Carmel del Rey, Oaks, 00:39:55
Monterey Sand City and Seaside and the county of Monterey. And I'm the representative from the city of Pacific Grove. So once a 00:40:02
month we go to the Monterey One Water offices out in Rhine Ranch and a representative from all of those cities and the county and 00:40:08
the and Monterey One Water who acts as the kind of facilitator of the group and has a dedicated staff for that to operate this 00:40:15
program. 00:40:22
Meet and discuss runoff issues and how we're going to implement the program components. 00:40:29
And it's the tasks that the city is required to do and that the city wants to do are so much more than what I as an individual 00:40:35
would ever be able to do. And by teaming up with all these cities, we're able to kind of utilize the budgets that we have and get 00:40:43
a lot more bang for our buck by working together. Because a lot of the requirements that we have are the same that all these other 00:40:50
cities have. So we're able to team up and much more efficiently accomplish these goals. 00:40:57
And those goals include mitigation, mitigating pollution at construction sites, investigating and enforcing illegal dumping, 00:41:05
educating and inspecting businesses. 00:41:10
Teaching and enforcing Good Housekeeping practices, engaging the community, promoting volunteerism, engaging the design community 00:41:16
and encouraging low impact development. And then all of the different storm water sampling programs. The first flush. 00:41:24
So MS-4 stands for a municipal separate storm sewer system. 00:41:33
So in Pacific Grove, we have separate conveyances. We have the sanitary sewer where all of the sewage of the city flows downhill, 00:41:39
and it used to flow to suffer Grove's own sewage treatment plant. So if you've ever noticed the kind of very cool looking Art Deco 00:41:47
buildings hidden behind Crespi Pond or hidden behind the 17th Tee box obscured by Cypress trees that used to be the sewage plant 00:41:54
for Pacific growth. 00:42:02
And it used to very minimally treat the sewage and then pump it right onto the Bay. So if you've ever walked out to the little 00:42:10
island, to the little Point Pinas Island and you've seen that big cast iron pipe stuck in the rocks, that's the old sewage out 00:42:16
outfall Pipe's. 00:42:22
But once the regional effort was underway to kind of combine all of the sewage of the peninsula and send it to Marina to the 00:42:30
Monterey. 00:42:35
That's the Monterey Wastewater Treatment District, which is now called Monterey One water, that facility was shut down and was 00:42:41
inactive for a couple decades or I think several decades and then just recently and I think 2017, it was brought back online not 00:42:49
as a sewage treatment but as a water project. So now some of the sewage in Pacific Grove goes to our water treatment project in 00:42:56
the that is housed in the former sewage treatment facility. 00:43:03
And that water is treated not to be potable water for drinking, but to be agricultural irrigation water. And the city uses that 00:43:11
water at the golf course and at the cemetery. And then also usually when we need to fill up water trucks. So like if we fill the 00:43:18
water Buffalo or if we need to fill up water for the street sweeper, when possible we use that water. 00:43:25
And. 00:43:32
By implementing that project, the city not was able to also acquire a bunch of water permits. So all the ADUS you see it going up 00:43:35
in town or all the people that are doing construction or are able to buy water permits. That's kind of a special thing that 00:43:40
Pacific Grove has where a lot of the other cities in the area don't have any extra water credits and haven't for a long time. And 00:43:46
the city Pacific only has those water credits available because we got them back when we switched the cemetery and the golf course 00:43:52
to using. 00:43:58
Water that we created from the Water Treatment project. 00:44:05
And then separately from the sanitary sewer which is all self-contained and is pumped, you know, gravity fed to the coast and then 00:44:12
pumped to, you know, pumped up at lift stations and then gravity fed and steps along the way all the way to Marina where it is 00:44:18
treated separately. We have our storm sewer system, the municipal separate storm sewer system which I'll refer to now is just 00:44:24
MS-4. 00:44:30
And that is not something that is universal through the city. There's some parts of the city that have no MS-4 system and most and 00:44:37
storm water just flows down our surface gutters. And then there's other areas where we have a pretty elaborate Ms. 4 system or 00:44:42
storm sewer system. 00:44:48
And the, the regulation that we referred to, NPDES has requirements for anybody or any entity that discharges into water bodies, 00:44:56
whether it's the ocean or a river or a lake. And if you're like, let's say, a construction project or a factory, you would have to 00:45:03
get an NPD EE S permit, a discharge permit. And then there's a special category of permits for cities, which are the MS-4 permits. 00:45:10
And then there's the two phases. 00:45:17
And then so phase one are the big 100,000 plus cities phase two or the smaller under 100,000 and then even amongst those MS-4 00:45:25
phase two phases, there's more I. 00:45:31
Breakdowns are traditional and non traditional small and isn't that. But to keep it simple Pacific Grove is a regulated small and 00:45:37
this for traditional permit. So Pacific Grove submits an annual report to the State Water Resources Control Board detailing 00:45:44
everything we do to be compliant with that permit and I. 00:45:50
If you're ever wondering if I'm. 00:45:58
If you're wondering what I do as the environmental program manager, about 80% of my job is probably this. It's a takes a 00:46:00
tremendous amount of time and it's a huge effort that includes Public Works, the Community development department and our building 00:46:06
officials and our code compliance Officer. And it's it's a big effort to maintain that permit with the State Water Resources 00:46:12
Control Board. 00:46:18
And some of the components, there are so many components to it that I can't touch on all of them. So I'm just going to kind of do 00:46:25
broad strokes. 00:46:29
A big part of what we do, and we do this part very much in collaboration with the Mr. Swim program, is public outreach and 00:46:32
education. 00:46:37
And that includes classroom programs. So we have, we work with Save the Whales Foundation and they do outreach at all of the local 00:46:42
auctions at all but all of the local schools that will have them. They go and give talks and you know, have a big inflatable whale 00:46:49
and bring all these props and explain to kids all about, you know, pollution and the importance of storm water. They table at all 00:46:55
sorts of events for us. So you know, if good old days and you know, not in San City and any sort of event that they can get get to 00:47:02
and they'll be there. 00:47:09
And then we work a lot with businesses, so and construction and that includes our building department insisting on certain best 00:47:16
management practices included on building plans and then our building officials being trained in the storm water regulations and 00:47:24
then regular inspections of certain construction sites just for their storm water practices. 00:47:31
And then also as a collaborative, we also fund the creation and dissemination of advertising. So after I get through this 00:47:40
PowerPoint, I can show you some of the recent television ads that we filmed here in Pacific Grove actually and are now airing on 00:47:48
all the local cable channels in both English and Spanish. And then also social media outreach. And there is a website, 00:47:55
montereyc.org that has detailed information for businesses for construction. 00:48:03
Industry people. 00:48:11
And for students. 00:48:13
And then another. 00:48:15
Thing that the city does in order to meet our MS-4 requirements is urban diversion as alluded to by Lindsey. And that is where we 00:48:17
capture storm water and separate the solids and divert the rest into the sewer system. And the main goal there is to reduce the 00:48:26
amount of Putin's going into the Bay. But a secondary goal is to add water to our sewer system that can be treated and reused by 00:48:35
Monterey One water, because all that water that goes into our sewer system and makes its way to Marina for Monterey run water. 00:48:44
Is that? 00:48:54
They treat, The first thing they do with it is treat as much as they can to the highest level and that gets reinjected into the 00:48:55
seaside groundwater basin for later use. So during wet months, they take as much treated water as they can and they inject it into 00:49:01
the ground and seaside. And if you've ever driven along General Jim Moore and you've seen the big pump stations and the pump 00:49:07
houses out there, those are mostly injection wells. 00:49:13
And that is kind of been the big water project that the Monterey Peninsula Water Management District has accomplished in the last 00:49:20
couple decades, is injecting treated water into the ground to mitigate saltwater intrusion and then to have that water stored for 00:49:27
the dry months that they can then pump it back out and use it. 00:49:33
And then they also treat water to a slightly less degree that gets sent out to the Salinas Valley for agricultural irrigation. And 00:49:41
then during really wet months, they exceed their potential to treat it for either of those uses and some water still gets treated 00:49:47
to a slightly lesser degree and gets pumped back out into the the ocean. 00:49:53
But the urban diversion system in Pacific Grove doesn't cover our entire watershed here. It roughly if you look roughly covers 00:50:00
from the aquarium to Sea Palm which is the majority of our ASPs the state designated area of special biological significance. So 00:50:07
and it covers our downtown area and the kind of the most densely populated areas. So most of that water is captured in our MS-4 00:50:14
system and is diverted into the. 00:50:21
Sanitary sewer and During the dry months it's close to 100% and then during the really rainy months it's set. It's designed to 00:50:29
capture a runoff up to the 85th percentile of storm events like I can try to explain earlier. 00:50:36
And the reason that they don't we don't have that as the 100 percentile is because it's for two reasons. One, it just wouldn't be 00:50:45
practical to build a system, you know the that would just you. It would be an oversized system that would only see use during the 00:50:51
most extreme weather events. 00:50:57
And the cost of that was 1 issue, but then another issue is during those really stormy high rain events, that's when we least need 00:51:03
the water, you know, because that's when Monterey One Water has all the water they could possibly use. So if we had designed the 00:51:10
system to go up to a higher than 85th percentile, which is an industry standard, it would be exceedingly expensive with 00:51:17
diminishing returns. And that's so that's that kind of, I hope that explains the 85th percentile. 00:51:24
And just so you kind of have a visual on what we're talking about here, here's some construction pictures of the urban diversion 00:51:33
cisterns or vaults where the water is caught in the storm drains. It is through a hydrodynamic separator, which is kind of like a 00:51:40
a centrifugal vortex that knocks down the solids and allows the liquid water to carry on. 00:51:48
And so here is the vault that is under one of the tea boxes in the golf course. And you can see some of these systems are massive 00:51:59
and if you didn't know, know you can see at the bottom, right? That's what it looks like. Now you wouldn't barely know it's there 00:52:06
because it's covered with a tea box and a fairway, but you have this kind of building size vault underground. 00:52:13
And that water is collected from the storm water system and then diverted into the sanitary sewer. 00:52:25
And then the sanitary sewer is conveyed to the regional treatment plant in Marina. 00:52:31
The edge of Berwick Park and that includes a vault that collects sewage and then when the vault fills up to a certain amount, the 00:53:09
pumps automatically turn on and pump. 00:53:15
The sewage up to the next kind of leg of its journey, where it can then use gravity to carry itself to the next lift station. 00:53:20
All the way to Marina. 00:53:30
And then a. 00:53:34
Another effort that the city takes in and you know as part of our MS-4 permit requirements is St. Sweeping. 00:53:35
And in the city of the City of Pacific Grove used to have full full time maintenance workers, city staff that and owned its own 00:53:45
St. Sweeping equipment. But it it's been decades now that we've contracted these services and currently we contract these services 00:53:52
with a company called Accent Clean and Sweep. And the RFP process for that contract most recently went to bid in June of 2022 and 00:54:00
just recently and the current contract is about $205,000 a year. 00:54:08
And that is has historically been funded entirely from proceeds of our green waste franchise agreement, a litter abatement fee. So 00:54:17
when everybody in town pays their trash bill for greenways to pick up their waste, 3.9% of those gross receipts gets put into a 00:54:25
fund for the city called the litter abatement fee. And that pretty closely has covered the street sweeping contract. So right now 00:54:33
the the city plays plays close to nothing for streets weeping. It's all covered by that. 00:54:40
Litter abatement fee and I think originally was designed just to meet kind of the minimum requirements of the Mississippi 4 00:54:49
permit. 00:54:52
And here I've got some. 00:54:58
Commissioner submitted photos of kind of areas in need of St. sweeping in town and by no means does the city think that our 00:55:00
streets sweeping efforts are perfect to keep all debris and all litter off our streets. But it is part of a combined effort to 00:55:08
keep their outfalls of, you know, things flowing into the Bay clean. And there is the way it's set up now, there are going to be 00:55:15
areas that aren't, you know, perfectly hit by the street sweeper. 00:55:22
I think most of these sites, depending on what part of town they are, will will be either filtered or separated in the storm 00:55:31
drains, or will be diverted entirely from the Bay. 00:55:37
And then I also think it's worth noting, looking around town and where I work at the public works office and the street sweeper 00:55:43
comes in, you know, three times at three times a week and all day is dumping his collection of St. sweeping. It's mostly organic 00:55:49
debris that the street sweeper is picking up. And we have a remarkably clean town. I'm not saying it's perfect, of course we have 00:55:55
litter and we have plastic and we have things, But compared to some other places, most of what the street super picks up is plant 00:56:01
matter. 00:56:07
And. 00:56:16
Some of the challenges that we have are timing. Ideally we would have the street sweeper come on a route the day after waste pick 00:56:17
up days and that is sort of the street trooper doesn't have to dodge all the bins on the street. And so that any trash or 00:56:25
recycling that falls out of the bin or isn't picked up perfectly from the trash truck can get picked up by the street sweeper. But 00:56:34
that creates problems because the the schedules it can be an issue and I think you know this schedule was. 00:56:42
This street sweeping schedule was created when we first started working with Accent Clean and Sweep many years ago and it hasn't 00:56:51
changed much. And since then I think that the green waste routes have changed and there's always going to be issues because the 00:56:57
Greenways drivers have their own holidays where they might shift a day and then our accent, you know, then the street sweeping 00:57:03
company has their own issues where maybe they have to do maintenance or they need to swap out a sweeper or swap out an employee. 00:57:09
So even at the best efforts. 00:57:16
Scheduling the streets we put to not interfere with waste pickup is a huge challenge, and it is time that the city sits down with 00:57:22
both green waste, the trash trucks, and the street sweeper and revisits this schedule. Because there's some notable places in town 00:57:27
where there's a conflict right now with waste pickup days, and that's an effort that Public Works is going to be making in the 00:57:33
coming months. 00:57:38
Another issue is encouraging parked cars not to block access. And some some cities some. 00:57:44
Especially big cities will have no parking signs in neighborhoods for St. sweeping days. So you you'll see a sign that says no 00:57:53
parking on, you know, Tuesday or of the month. The first Tuesday of the month are different things. But the reality is in Pacific 00:57:59
Grove, we don't have the manpower to enforce that. And we're not necessarily, I'm not sure that we have the willpower either to, 00:58:06
you know, people are so accustomed to parking. 00:58:12
Kind of when and where they want, and I think that would be a big ask. So it's all going to come out to come down to just 00:58:19
encouraging and doing the public outreach and teaching people the importance of moving their cars. 00:58:25
And there are, I think there are certain places in town where we have no parking on certain days like in the like behind like on 00:58:31
Mermaid Ave. where it's a really tight Ave. But for the most part we don't try and do that. And then obviously we have budget 00:58:37
limitations. Right now the street sweeping program is paid for almost entirely by the litter abatement fee. So I think any effort 00:58:44
to increase streets whooping that's going to be the biggest question is how we're going to pay for it. 00:58:50
I'm going to close this with. 00:59:00
Cartoon for Commissioner Dunn. 00:59:02
Tell me straight, are the micro plastics in my bloodstream recyclable? 00:59:06
And. 00:59:17
And then real quick too, I'm going to. 00:59:19
Share with you a video. 00:59:22
From the. 00:59:25
Mr. SWIP Swim Outreach Program. 00:59:29
Down here in Pacific Grove. 00:59:41
We tried to have a little bit of fun with it. 00:59:53
Actually see if I can get my volume to work one second. 01:00:00
I'll just show you the thumbnails so. 01:00:17
But this is just an example of some of the outreach that the Mr. Swim program is doing. So a whole collection of these short TV 01:00:25
ads, 3030 seconds each, using local kids that speak English and Spanish, pretending to be sports officials. So it'll be like 01:00:31
somebody putting out their cigarette **** and flicking it, and then the little soccer referee comes and gives him a red card. Or, 01:00:37
you know, different, different iterations of that. 01:00:44
About it and if you're more, if you're interested and you don't see them on TV, go to montereyc.org and you can see all of them. 01:00:52
And with that, I'm happy to answer any questions. 01:01:00
Thank you. Let's go to public comment first. 01:01:05
I. 01:01:10
Not have any hands raised in the audience. 01:01:14
OK. I'm sorry. Go ahead. 01:01:18
Excuse me, We do have one hand raised, so I will open it up to Lisa Chaney. 01:01:21
Thank you. I'm, I'm not sure this my question relates to this part, but just back on crispy pond where Lindsey said. 01:01:26
They have to, really. 01:01:41
Research. 01:01:43
To get more information about what specifically the pollutants are at Crestview Pond and I just wondered. 01:01:46
Who would do the research and how would it be funded? And if that doesn't apply now then then I'll ask you after the meeting. 01:01:55
Thank you. 01:02:05
We have no further hands raised. 01:02:12
OK, Commissioner, comments and questions. 01:02:15
First Secretary. Done. 01:02:20
Thank you so much, George. And I know you've put a lot of time into this and well done. Thank you. And I have a question and it 01:02:23
kind of ties into what Lindsey had said earlier. I, if I understood correctly, Lindsey said that the city has not been used, has 01:02:29
been using potable water at the golf course in the cemetery. But in your report you said that is either not the case or no longer 01:02:36
the case. 01:02:43